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Discussion Starter #1
I took apart my skid last winter to clean it up, remove some rust, replace some parts, and paint. But now I’m having some issues with it. When it was installed in the sled it did not extend all the way, even when the track was lifted off the ground. But when me or a buddy sat on it, the sled bottomed out. So we pulled the skid out and it extended all the way outside the tunnel. But when I stand on the torsion springs (I’m 260lbs) the rear skid assembly doesn’t start to move until I jump. It all feels off.
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65645

I am really out of my league with this, so I don’t know if a parts broken or if I put it together wrong. Thoughts?
 

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Replace the shock if you replaced it with a hydraulic shock. Those are not known to rebound all that well. Go with a gas shock. Either find a SPI or Kimpex or even better is a rebuildable Xtra-10 Fox Shock. Shock Length from eyelet to eyelet will be around 15 inches. Also idk if you did anything with the front shock but those need to be serviced as well. Also even if the torsion springs on those are thicker on a Polaris then they will still rebound. I would pull the shafts out and clean them up as over time grease can get nasty and not work as well. Make sure you use a good Cold Weather water resistant grease. Make sure the those two a arms are able to move freely as those can lock up over time. I just put new torsion springs on both of my Polaris Xtra-10 suspension and they are a little thicker. The optional torsion springs were OEM on some Xtra-10 suspensions but some didn't get them but Polaris allowed you to upgrade to those if you wanted a stiffer suspension. Also make sure that the little black block isn't set wrong either. The spring sits on those and those have a soft, medium and stiff suspension setting. Also when you pull out the shafts clean up the threads as well if you need to and the bolts holding them in. When you put those new bolts in use Blue Loctite on the threads so they do not back out yet you can still get them out down the road if you can.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Replace the shock if you replaced it with a hydraulic shock. Those are not known to rebound all that well. Go with a gas shock. Either find a SPI or Kimpex or even better is a rebuildable Xtra-10 Fox Shock. Shock Length from eyelet to eyelet will be around 15 inches. Also idk if you did anything with the front shock but those need to be serviced as well. Also even if the torsion springs on those are thicker on a Polaris then they will still rebound. I would pull the shafts out and clean them up as over time grease can get nasty and not work as well. Make sure you use a good Cold Weather water resistant grease. Make sure the those two a arms are able to move freely as those can lock up over time. I just put new torsion springs on both of my Polaris Xtra-10 suspension and they are a little thicker. The optional torsion springs were OEM on some Xtra-10 suspensions but some didn't get them but Polaris allowed you to upgrade to those if you wanted a stiffer suspension. Also make sure that the little black block isn't set wrong either. The spring sits on those and those have a soft, medium and stiff suspension setting. Also when you pull out the shafts clean up the threads as well if you need to and the bolts holding them in. When you put those new bolts in use Blue Loctite on the threads so they do not back out yet you can still get them out down the road if you can.
I pulled the the top shafts off the skid, the rear one is straight and seems like it was well greased. While the front one looks like it was never greased, when I tapped it out old powder grease fell out. Could this of been the problem? I have since wire brushed it off and applied a coat of grease to it. How do I clean the outer tube?
 

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Are you talking about the tube it goes into? I use a round cylinder brush on mine and attach it to a regular old drill go back and forth with it. I wouldn't have wire brushed it off but it won't do any damage. I personally use rags to wipe it all down so same principle. Make sure you pump in some new grease on all grease zerts on the snowmobile. There is one behind the secondary clutch, at the ski spindles, steering, rear suspension in should be 3 spots. One at the bottom of the rear rear shock and then of course one at the front of each of those tubes on the outer part of it. I would also replace that hydraulic shock if it is one. Those things stink even from factory. Make sure that the rear torsion spring block is set right as well. Even though it has 4 positions on it only 3 work properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Those look like new springs. If they are maybe they are the wrong ones and are too stiff.
As far as I know, they are the right springs. They were listed with the manufacturer number, and the stickers had the same product number. The springs are tighter then my original pair, but on the parts list these are a heavier option
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Are you talking about the tube it goes into? I use a round cylinder brush on mine and attach it to a regular old drill go back and forth with it. I wouldn't have wire brushed it off but it won't do any damage. I personally use rags to wipe it all down so same principle. Make sure you pump in some new grease on all grease zerts on the snowmobile. There is one behind the secondary clutch, at the ski spindles, steering, rear suspension in should be 3 spots. One at the bottom of the rear rear shock and then of course one at the front of each of those tubes on the outer part of it. I would also replace that hydraulic shock if it is one. Those things stink even from factory. Make sure that the rear torsion spring block is set right as well. Even though it has 4 positions on it only 3 work properly.
I’m going to use the hydraulic shock for this upcoming trip, I will rebuild my original one and the front one after my upcoming trip
 

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Optional springs were on some snowmobiles from factory others had them as an option. I just put a set of SPI Springs on my '98 Indy 440 L/C and can tell you right now they are thicker then the stock ones that were 22.5 years old. I also got them on clearance. I bought 2 for the left and 2 for the right for both of my snowmobiles cost me a whopping 100 dollars with shipping from MFG Supply and I had them in 24 hours. Only took 24 hours from the time they were shipped to my doorstep that is customer service!

Good be that the a-arms are not flexing correctly either just watch it on the trip and clean out that tube before you go. Make sure you set the track tension correctly as well so you are not having issues there either.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Optional springs were on some snowmobiles from factory others had them as an option. I just put a set of SPI Springs on my '98 Indy 440 L/C and can tell you right now they are thicker then the stock ones that were 22.5 years old. I also got them on clearance. I bought 2 for the left and 2 for the right for both of my snowmobiles cost me a whopping 100 dollars with shipping from MFG Supply and I had them in 24 hours. Only took 24 hours from the time they were shipped to my doorstep that is customer service!

Good be that the a-arms are not flexing correctly either just watch it on the trip and clean out that tube before you go. Make sure you set the track tension correctly as well so you are not having issues there either.
I am going to reinstall the skid tomorrow, I'll let you know if any problems persist. Thank you
 

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I would clean out the threads with a thread chaser as over time those can get gunky and clean up the bolts as well. Make sure you use some blue loctite on them also you want to keep them in but be able to take them out down the road. Once you put it on and get them nice and tight. Make sure you bring along a wrench with the right size socket just in case. Once I do that on mine even though it isn't recommended I wait at least 24 hours before moving or sitting on the snowmobile. I had a bad shaft once and no matter what I did the bolts would come loose if I only waited a couple hours. Once I waited a couple days they were fine. Idk why it was like that as it shouldn't be but it happened. So I carry blue loctite as well everywhere I go, I keep a big bag of tools, tow rope, quart of antifreeze, quart of AMSOIL, fuel line, old but good spare fuel pump, fuel filter, spare carburetor kit with needle/seat, spare spark plugs and caps along with a few other odds and ends. All this stuff shockingly fits in both snowmobiles without a problem both storage units in the seat are stuff as we also stuff in a spare set of gloves for each of us and maps but it works. All those items have helped us over the 42 years I have been riding at one point or another. Nothing worse then breaking down on the side of the trail and not having a part that you know you have back at the trailer or garage.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I would clean out the threads with a thread chaser as over time those can get gunky and clean up the bolts as well. Make sure you use some blue loctite on them also you want to keep them in but be able to take them out down the road. Once you put it on and get them nice and tight. Make sure you bring along a wrench with the right size socket just in case. Once I do that on mine even though it isn't recommended I wait at least 24 hours before moving or sitting on the snowmobile. I had a bad shaft once and no matter what I did the bolts would come loose if I only waited a couple hours. Once I waited a couple days they were fine. Idk why it was like that as it shouldn't be but it happened. So I carry blue loctite as well everywhere I go, I keep a big bag of tools, tow rope, quart of antifreeze, quart of AMSOIL, fuel line, old but good spare fuel pump, fuel filter, spare carburetor kit with needle/seat, spare spark plugs and caps along with a few other odds and ends. All this stuff shockingly fits in both snowmobiles without a problem both storage units in the seat are stuff as we also stuff in a spare set of gloves for each of us and maps but it works. All those items have helped us over the 42 years I have been riding at one point or another. Nothing worse then breaking down on the side of the trail and not having a part that you know you have back at the trailer or garage.
The grease fitting for the front and uppermost tube is clogged, and I brought my original fox shock gas shocks to a shop to be rebuilt, just the two rear ones are going to cost around $100 they said. I am just going to take off the old grease fitting, then run a cylinder brush through it, then reinstall a new grease fitting and grease everything up. My shocks will not be done until Friday, so I am going to reinstall everything except for them and make sure everything feels lubed properly.
 

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100 dollars is about right to rebuild those. If it was clogged then who knows how long it went without grease.
 

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Welcome
I have a grease driver!
It is a hammer type, it pushes the grease through clogged nips
 
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