Snowmobile Forum banner
61 - 80 of 82 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
Here's my turd I just sold. 05 lly duramax i built. Had a guy build a tranny for it at 5 grand and he screwed up and i got fed up with truck so i sold it and still made money. Pulled our 35 foot v nose down the road like a champ. Going to get a lbz next. For now I'm stuck with a 99 half ton I bought wrecked just so I have something to get around in.
Tire Automotive tire Vehicle Car Wheel

Land vehicle Vehicle Car Automotive tire Pickup truck



Sent from my iPhone using Snowmobile.com Free App
 

· Sled Of The Month Judge
Joined
·
2,867 Posts
Don't laugh too much: 2004 Chrysler Pacifica.

Granted, I really have only hauled them in the very beginning or end of the season. Usually I just ride from my driveway.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 6-speed. This will be the first season of pulling my 3 place v-Nose flatbed trailer. We'll see how it goes? It has a tow rating of 3500 lb's. I will be pulling no more then 2500, but more like 2000lb.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I had a Rabnger FX4 lvl 2 4.0 in it towed 2sleds good avg gas mileage 12
Now I'm towing with a Subaru Outback 2.5 and avg gas mileage 12, however I wouldn't recommend this the breaks and suspension need to be a lot better, could add trailer breaks
Thinking about trading it in but I like the 30mpg normal driving however this drops to 18 in the winter because of stupid CVT transmission


Sent from Snowmobile.com App
 

· SD Rider
Joined
·
4,340 Posts
Well I think since the last time I posted in this we had different vehicles. Since then dad and my brother got full size pickups.

The first picture is my brother's pickup with our new 7x20 enclosed behind it, taken the day we got the trailer. The pickup is an '04 Ram 1500.

Second picture is dad's new pickup, a '13 Ram 1500 Laramie Longhorn.

I still drive my '99 Durango.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
08 Honda Pilot with my Snowbear landscape trailer.

Pilot's got Firestone airbags and a Derale transmission cooler for towing the pop-up so it hauls my XLT perfectly.
How long you been pulling with that rig? I've towed the sled trailer with an '11 Tundra 5.7 and it you never knew it was there. Running that rig was outrageously expensive, and I swapped to an AWD Ford Flex. Pulled ok, but Ford's AWD does not permanently engage the rear wheels. Descents were sketchy on snowy roads.

I have an Explorer 4WD now, wondering how it will do.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
My last tow vehicle was a V8 Explorer back when they were body on frame trucks with real towing capacity so compared to that it is definitely different.

This Pilot is basically a blown up Odyssey and the tow rating is 3500 lbs with a transmission and power steering line cooler and 5000 lbs if you are towing a boat (I guess because of aerodynamics). But you have to remember that they count gear (and even number of people in the car) in the rear toward that towing capacity.

We took it to Yellowstone with five people, 1000 lbs of gear in the back, and a 2200 lb popup this last fall. It was a 1500 mile round trip.

There is no way I would load down and tow with a Unibody SUV without rear air bags. They helped level the ride significantly which helps keep the headlights pointed at the road and keeps the tires from darting. We hit a major downpour and hydroplaned a couple of times but without those air bags it would have been unmanageable. As far as ride it was awesome, never bottomed out and none of the gear in the back got thrown around.

The Pilot has about 240 horsepower and pulls very well. On the flats here in North Dakota I could see it pulling a 5000 lb boat no problem at at. Around town is where it really shines but once you get out on the highway you have a dilemma: tow in D or tow in D3. The five speed transmission in the pilot has two Overdrive gears 4th and 5th. So if you are towing a heavy load you have to do it in 3rd gear. Which means at 65 mph you are at 3600 RPM. At 70 you are pushing 4000! The mileage was still pretty good - we were getting around 14 mpg but I really wish I could tow in 4th.

We entered Yellowstone in the Northeast going through Beartooth Pass which is a ton of low speed switchbacks. That actually went really well and the Pilot pulled strong and the transmission didn't hunt too much. We left Yellowstone out of the Southeast toward Cody, WY which is less switchbacks and more like climbing a 5% grade straight up for what seams like an eternity! For that the pilot didn't do too well. The speed limit was 40 MPH which is where it would just shift into 3rd gear...then the engine would slowly loose speed until it downshifted into 2nd and rev to 5000 RPM for what seems like forever until it dropped back into third and we would start all over again. I am sure it was really hard on the transmission which is why I am glad I installed that Derale cooler. We checked the fluid at each gas stop and it never smelled hot or burned. I could touch the cooler with my hand so I know it wasn't overheating.

Overall, if you are just towing a two or even three snowmobiles in the flats I would say a Unibody Explorer would do just fine. But if you are doing serious towing through the mountains add the accessories and drive 65 or less.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
I towed with an Odyessy - wasn't impressed. While the Explorer has a higher HP motor, the gearing and torque matter more to towing. I'm not sure how the two compare on that.

Just a point of clarification... Accessories, gear, passengers, etc. do not count toward towing capacity specifically. They count toward a) GVWR including trailer and b) weight on the rear suspension. As you stated - too much tongue weight + cargo / passenger weight and the truck squats. This causes all kinds of issues, including reduced braking, poor steering, and your headlights shining in the sky.

I passed on a Pilot specifically because I had read a number of comments about them being underpowered for their size. I do a LOT of highway miles and a good portion of driving with either the whole family in tow or an actual trailer in tow. It sounds like I'll potentially have a little more oomph from the Explorer.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Just a point of clarification... Accessories, gear, passengers, etc. do not count toward towing capacity specifically. They count toward a) GVWR including trailer and b) weight on the rear suspension.
I thought that too...but my owners manual says this:



Basically trailer weight towing capacity goes down with the number of passengers and cargo. It's lame...but like I said, it's a glorified minivan...

I'm sure we were maxed out on our Yellowstone trip! And, I agree somewhat the Explorer will be a better towing vehicle but not by a significant margin as it is still a uni-body suv and horsepower wasn't the issue but suspension capability.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
I thought that too...but my owners manual says this:



Basically trailer weight towing capacity goes down with the number of passengers and cargo. It's lame...but like I said, it's a glorified minivan...

I'm sure we were maxed out on our Yellowstone trip! And, I agree somewhat the Explorer will be a better towing vehicle but not by a significant margin as it is still a uni-body suv and horsepower wasn't the issue but suspension capability.
Yes... It's a bit of both, I suppose. The extra weight of cargo and passengers not only counts toward GVWR but also adds weight to the rear suspension. This reduces that amount of weight "available" for carrying tongue weight. And, since total trailer weight is directly related to tongue weight (typically, tongue weight should equal 10% of the total trailer weight), the amount you can tow drops off as well.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Yes... It's a bit of both, I suppose. The extra weight of cargo and passengers not only counts toward GVWR but also adds weight to the rear suspension. This reduces that amount of weight "available" for carrying tongue weight. And, since total trailer weight is directly related to tongue weight (typically, tongue weight should equal 10% of the total trailer weight), the amount you can tow drops off as well.
I never thought of it that way...it makes total sense.

In my humble opinion, if you are towing anything over 1500 lbs with a car or Unibody SUV this is the best $100 you can spend:

2014 Ford Explorer Suspension Enhancement | etrailer.com

 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
The problem with airbags is that MANY people use them as a "replacement" for proper towing equipment. For example: Instead of using a Weight Distributing Hitch, they rely on the airbags to control squat. If the tongue weight is controlled and distributed properly, you're affecting the weight on the front axle and that's dangerous - regardless.

Used properly, air bags go a long way. While I can appreciate what you're saying about over 1500lbs, it really comes down to what the vehicle can safely handle. I towed 10,000 lbs behind my Tundra with no air bags, no WDH, and no problems. It all comes down to proper equipment and correct trailer loading.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Good point. I am not saying they help you pull a larger load or add tongue weight. I was not trying to recommend going over capacity because you have air bags or to say that they added to your towing ability. But they certainly add to safety because they help level the car adding more front tire force and because I installed the lines independently I can adjust for side to side load. They also add to ride comfort.

My Pilot's rear suspension is so soft that without towing anything, with no cargo in the back, if you have three adult passengers in the back seat the rear has a delayed squat (don't know what else to call it) when going over bumps. Before I installed the air bags it honestly felt "floaty" on the interstate a little like you were out of control because of the body roll side to side and front to back. Now, I run 15-20 lbs all the time and it gives it a more truck like ride, which also means it feels more controlled.

Dollars to donuts...it's a good purchase. Thanks for bringing up that clarification.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
2005 Toyota Sequoia with a large 4.7 liter engine only producing a whimpy 282 horsepower lol. Get about 15 on the highway and 13 when towing 1500lbs. 2 snowmobiles and a Floe trailer with salt shield. I really want my dad to sell this suv and get something with better mpg, my mom wants something smaller. I'm thinking a GMC Yukon is in our sights maybe! We really need AWD, didn't need it in the south haha.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Tow rating is actually directly related to the number of passengers AND cargo in the vehicle. It isn't only due to the RAR (rear axle rating- though you have to watch this also!) but related to the GCWR (gross combined weight rating= vehicle + trailer).

GCWR- actual vehicle weight= max trailer weight. Until the new tow rating standard was followed recently, the manufactures would rate a vehicle's tow rating with only the driver and no cargo to get the max tow rating.

GVWR is the total weight the vehicle is rated for including tw (tongue weight) as stated. So one has to be mindful of all the manufactures ratings, and while not usually an issue, don't forget the FAR (front axle rating) either.

ALSO, remember to subtract any and all accessories you add to your vehicle! Bed liner, tonneau cover/truck topper, step bars, etc. Anything that would not have been included in/ on the vehicle when it was weighed as it rolled off the assembly line (since '06 or so each vehicle has a yellow sticker in the drivers door jamb. "Passengers and cargo not to exceed "XXXX"lbs.)

TW can range from 10-15% depending on the trailer and it's design. Open trailer are lower, enclosed and travel trailers a bit higher, though again depending how it was designed. If you are having an issue towing a trailer, weighing it is the best way to find out if you have an issue or not. BUT, you may need to in crease tw to make that trailer a little more stable even if the tw # looks good. I have a travel trailer (tt) that at 12.6% tw it wasn't 100% stable. While I haven't reweighed it yet, I moved some things around to increase the tw and it is stable now.

I have learned a lot, but am still learning! I used to be in the "Oh I have "XXXXX"lbs tow rating, I'm good" crowd! Main reason we have a 2500HD now as we were over our GVWR by up to 200lbs (still under RAR by a little) with our 1500.

And as Meburdick replied about air bags, they can help, but a lot of times they are not used right. Most times a wd (weight distribution) hitch is needed, not air baags.
 
61 - 80 of 82 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top