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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 500cc motor from a 1987 artic cat panther snowmobile. I Installed the motor on a buggy I built for my grandson and me to play with. I am trying to put Voltage regulator on it for lights and stuff. I have a wiring diagram for it but I'm not clear on how hooks up. There is 4 wires coming
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from the statorthat go directly to the cdi box then there's another 4 wires coming from there also 2 yellow 1 brown and one black. I used the black wore for the kill switch, the brown is ground and the 2 yellows were jumpered together at the plug.here is a copy of the wiring diagrM I'm looking at. Any suggestions or help would be appreciated
 

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Brown Electrical Common; Chassis Ground
The brown wire is connected to the chassis at the engine stator plate and also through the voltage regulator chassis bolt (prior to 1989, the taillight harness also had a chassis connection). The headlight bracket is grounded on some models to reduce the bracket RFI emissions. All brown wires are common ground.

Yellow AC Power; 13 Volts AC (Alternating Current)
The yellow wire is connected to the engine stator plate lighting coil and the voltage regulator. The voltage produced by the lighting coil is very engine RPM dependent. The voltage regulator is necessary to maintain 13.5 VAC on the yellow wire whenever the engine exceeds about 3000 RPM. All yellow wires are 13 VAC. The signal on the yellow wire is AC. Not only is the voltage level of this signal RPM dependent, but the signal frequency (cycles per second) is RPM dependent as well. The electric tachometer uses this changing frequency phenomenon to indicate the engine RPM. An electric tachometer will operate properly when connected to any yellow (13 VAC) and brown (common ground) wire pair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Brown Electrical Common; Chassis Ground
The brown wire is connected to the chassis at the engine stator plate and also through the voltage regulator chassis bolt (prior to 1989, the taillight harness also had a chassis connection). The headlight bracket is grounded on some models to reduce the bracket RFI emissions. All brown wires are common ground.

Yellow AC Power; 13 Volts AC (Alternating Current)
The yellow wire is connected to the engine stator plate lighting coil and the voltage regulator. The voltage produced by the lighting coil is very engine RPM dependent. The voltage regulator is necessary to maintain 13.5 VAC on the yellow wire whenever the engine exceeds about 3000 RPM. All yellow wires are 13 VAC. The signal on the yellow wire is AC. Not only is the voltage level of this signal RPM dependent, but the signal frequency (cycles per second) is RPM dependent as well. The electric uses this changing frequency phenomenon to indicate the engine RPM. An electric tachometer will operate properly when connected to any yellow (13 VAC) and brown (common ground) wire pair.
I have a new voltage regulator on it anD I get the 13 volts AC. How do I get the DC to charge a battery and run the lights. With my meter on the yellow and brown the voltage goes up over 20VAC as I rev the motor. There is just 2 wires on the voltage regulator a yellow and a black. Do I put a diode in line to get the DC.
I also need to know why the voltage is getting so high wheni Rev the engine. I though the regulator was suppose to do that.
 

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Yep, regulator should keep the voltages around 14volts AC. If not the regulator is bad. New or not it's bad.

As for making DC voltage. Yes, use a FULL WAVE BRIDGE RECTIFIER with the AC coming off the Yellow and Chassis ground. You will then make 12-15vdc and then you do not want to put the ground to chassis ground you want to keep the 12V isolated on both + and - as to not short out anything.

If you want to charge a battery, get the regulator that does that. They make them for that application specifically on sleds.
 

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Like Steve said. A diode will definitely work to turn AC into DC, but in the conversion, half the AC wave form is lost. Using a bridge rectifier lets you keep both the upper and lower parts of the wave and no energy is lost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yep reg does not convert to DC
Well I just figured it was me not doing something right. I have 2 yellows and a brown coming from the stator. I measured resistance between the two yellows aND it read in the Meg so I figured that's ok Do the 3 yellow wires go together. The 2 from the stat0r and the brown is used for neg. On the lights, not chassis. Are both yellow the same? Oh yeah I'm using the black wire for my kill swithch
 
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