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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been riding Yamaha's and have been following this forum for years. I just purchased a 1984 Tucker Sno-Cat 1342 in great condition. I am looking for manuals and other support. Does anyone know of Tucker Sno-Cat Forum? I have found this web site valuable and would like to find one that covers Tuckers. If you know of one let me know. Also if anyone knows of a good source for manuals that would be helpful. I have bought manuals off ebay for some uncommon vehicles but couldn't find anything for Tuckers.

Thanks for any help
John
 

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Dan is me ;)

Tucker Sno-cats are made in Medford, Oregon, about 80 miles from where I live. Our grooming area is the closest trail system to their facility and they frequently bring cats up the hill for trials and testing, often parking at our cat shed.

I would definitely get in contact with them, they are very friendly and have a lot of knowledge, as they are a family-owned business with a lot of corporate history. They have awesome customer support, even for the old cats. They may have access to the factory manuals for your exact cat. They probably even have the blueprints, they pretty much have them for almost every cat they have sold. Most Tuckers are one-off... they build them one at a time, so there will be differences in cats from one to the next. I drove Tuckers on our trails from 2003 to about 2016 when we got a Pisten Bully.

Two of the resorts in our grooming area have purchased older Tuckers, one is close to yours in age... I think it's an 85. The other is a 2003. Both of those cats are still running on the snow, thanks in no small part to the folks at Tucker!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did call Tucker and talked to their Tech support. Very nice guy and we talked for about 10min. He specifically said that they don't provide manuals for any SnoCats older than year 2000. He did provide some information about fluid requirements. He did say that all the parts were available but suggested that I try matching the parts at NAPA first. Mine has a build list glued under the hood. It covers a lot of the replacement parts (brake shoes, calipers, etc). Some of which are no longer stocked but replacements are available.

Thanks for help
Cool Hand and Bob
 

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Definitely listen to them regarding the maintenance parts. I just helped change all the fluids and filters on the 2003 Tucker, another club member and I went up to help the new owners of the resort that just changed hands. We used Donaldson filters and got them at a truck parts store for a LOT less than through Tucker. When our club used Tuckers, the most repaired parts were the tie rod ends (get a couple sets of spares, you will need them!) and the transfer case. Keep that transfer case as full as possible, it's definitely a weak point.

If you have never driven a Tucker, never try to turn the steering wheel unless you are moving. That is a main contributor to breaking the ball joints that help steer. You can also steer right out of the track if you turn while stationary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dan
I have been warned of the "move before steering issue".

I am going to change all the filters and fluids. Since I have called Tucker I noticed that the differentials are locking type. Tucker recommended 75W-90 in everything. Does the diff require special anti-slip oil or is just 75w-90 okay? It depends if it has slip plates, if it is locking type that ratchets or just a solid block and neither slips or ratchets. The guy from Tucker did not mention anything.

Tucker also recommend using Chevron ATF HT389 in the hydraulic system. I have not been able find that anywhere. Is there a good substitute? Chevron markets about 5 ATFs and it is not clear if they are substantially different. I have an older Tucker service manual and that calls for Dexron (no suffix) which is not available anymore.

I also want to check the tension on the belted track. The old Tucker manual was not much help. Mostly just minimum clearance between the front and second wheels and making sure the belt comes off the drive sprocket cleanly. Is there a tried and true method for setting tension. Like sag or something. It might be too tight as it is. The track belts were purported to be recently changed and have very little wear.

I probably should call Tucker again but I don't want to pester them. At least not just yet.

I would give a lot for a good service manual right now.

Thanks
John

 

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I would call Tucker on the hydraulic fluid. On the one we just serviced, we used Chevron THF (Tractor Hydraulic Fluid) 1000. It's a synthetic fluid and was what was spec from Tucker for the 2004. Chevron ATF HD389 is a transmission fluid for pre-2006 on-road trucks. We used Delo SYN ATF HD when we changed the fluid in the transmission.

If the diffs have lockers, they won't be the limited slip friction type; they will be e-lockers which engage by an electric motor via a button in the cab. If your bogey wheels have liquid filled hubs, the 75-90 is what is spec for those, too. If they do have fluid filled, it would be a good idea to drain and refill, as those have potential to catch moisture and cause rust in the bogey wheel bearings.

For the tracks, tighten them enough so they don't ratchet when climbing. Too tight will wear things out prematurely. If you are on flat ground a lot, a bit loose is better than too tight.

The service manual will be helpful, but it may not be the most up to date. Tucker has been known to change fluid types over the years in response to part failure, most notably in the transfer case. On one of our cats, ATF was the original fluid recommended, then motor oil, then synthetic 75-90. So calling with questions should get you the most up to date answers.
 
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