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Discussion Starter #1
Thinking of getting another trailer for my two other sleds.
I have a tilt trailer now, that I ride off the front, but I see other
ride off trailers that have ramps. Is there any advantages either way?
The tilt trailer seems to work, but there is the danger of throwing someone off
and the ramp trailer seems to be more work, i.e., moving ramps.
Any other advice is greatly appreciated,
Thanks,
Bob
 

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How do you ride off of the front if it's a tilt? Typically, drive-on / drive-off trailers have ramps specifically so you can move them between front and back for that exact purpose.

I have a tilt clamshell enclosed. Drive on, back off. Works like a charm. Ramp trailers require that you lift and move the ramp from one location to another. Personally, the LAST thing I want to be doing after a long day on the trails is lugging a ramp around to get the sled loaded back up. Tilt is just too easy.
 

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You will find the lighter trailers are tilt, the heavier ones have a ramp. The bigger trailers would be harder to tilt due to the weight.

Side note.....
When loading on a tilt trailer, be carful that your ski won't catch on the trailer. I have had a broken carbide catch on the edge of the trailer and toss me completely off the sled when it stopped the sled trying to get onto a tilt trailer. Didn't know it was broken until I looked into it after lying in the snow for a bit wondering what the heck just happened! The ramp will have a much lower transition from the snow to the metal, making it easier to get onto the ramp and trailer if you have unknown problems.
 

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Tilt is the way to go. It might be difficult to lift the trailer back up when 1 sled is already on, but you can get gas shocks that lift the trailer for you basically. I have a floe tilt and you need 2 people to lift it up.
 

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Tilt is the way to go. It might be difficult to lift the trailer back up when 1 sled is already on, but you can get gas shocks that lift the trailer for you basically. I have a floe tilt and you need 2 people to lift it up.
Just position the first sled at the back of the trailer with the parking brake on and it holds the trailer for you to load the second sled. Once both are on, you just pull forward and lock it down. I load two sleds on my trailer by myself all the time.

Sent from my MB865 using Snowmobile.com App
 

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Ditto on that rczr600, tilt is the way to go, and your load procedure is right on.

But I am curious how the OP rides off the front of a tilt?
 

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Just position the first sled at the back of the trailer with the parking brake on and it holds the trailer for you to load the second sled. Once both are on, you just pull forward and lock it down. I load two sleds on my trailer by myself all the time.

Sent from my MB865 using Snowmobile.com App
Will have to try that!
 

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I ride my machines off the front of my tilt. Jack-knife the trailer and slowly ride off.

That said, I'd much rather have a ramp. Not just for the drive off, but tilt trailers usually have a 3-4" lip on the back that your skis/skegs/carbides will catch on just about every time. Tweaking the trailer's pivot point, which is usually just a large bolt that holds the tongue onto the center of the trailer.

I do like those trailers that have the hinged ramps up front that also protect your machines from dirt, mud, rocks, slush, etc flying up from your truck.

And just a shout out to the SuperClamp folks, I bought a set for my trailer and absolutely love them. Click-click and you're done. None of that screw down crap.

As for loading, I load my tilt trailer by myself a lot. I usually drive one machine up until it gets past the balance point. With the trailer level, push the machine back to where it wants to tilt, but easy enough to hold with one hand. Clamp it down and let it tilt back. Drive the other one up past the balance point, put the pin in to hold the trailer, clamp the snowmachine down, pull the other one forward again to give yourself about 100-150 lbs of tongue weight.

Or I'll do it like described above. Pull one on and lock the brake. Pull 2nd one on past the pivot and get the trailer to level. Put pin in and pull the 1st one forward.
 

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I should mention another mistake people make with Tilt trailers. Loading a dead sled on them. First, it takes two people. Keep the trailer level. Lift the skis up onto the trailer, and then one person pull on the skis while the other lifts the rear.

Alternate way: Tilt the trailer, and pull just the skis onto the trailer, lock the brake. Both people put their weight on the front of the trailer and when level, put the pin in and then one person pull on the skis and the other lifts the rear.


Trying to pull a sled up a slick deck is a lot more work then lifting half at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Cool info.

My current tilt trailer has a V nose with fold down front rock shields so I can fold each one down and ride off.

I did pick up a a V nose, flat trailer with a ramp. It can hold three sleds. with one turned sideway at the end. Since I have short tracks, I might be able to get four sleds on sideways if I need to go that route. I doubt that will be needed much, as it is hard to get that many folks going at one time. Might sell the tilt trailer that holds 2 sleds, but will wait to see how the season goes. But right now, I have two new issues…..

1. I ordered some Caliber Grip Guides to protect the new deck lid. I assume I just need to space them out about every 10" as listed on the web site. But what do I put under the sleds tracks?

2. SNOW………. We are hurting on snow here in Oregon. Not sure if I get to ride at all this holiday season……. not sure you guys can help with that………..

Any other advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Bob
 

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Even some wood strips mounted as cleats for the track to grip will work.
Old style tracks without the inside drive nubs works great.
You can take a bed liner and cut it up and use the ribbed section in short pieces to make traction bars.
Buy a cow mat and cut it into strips.
Old conveyer belting works too.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks again for all your help.

I did get a bunch of Caliber products and fixed up the tilt trailer. Maybe thinking of adding one of those gas charged struts to help the thing from slamming down.

My new problem is with my trailer with a ramp. It has a 5' ramp, with 1" bars, that keep catching my carbides, and the ramp moves. I then just used my rigs floor mats, and got the sleds back on. Then tried it with a couple of wood planks laid on top of the ramp, and that helped a ton.

I am thinking of covering my entire ramp with some wood, maybe plywood or peg board, so I don't have the issue of getting my runners up the ramp.

Any suggestions on the type of material to use, or just use some cheap 1/8 plywood or pegboard? Would masonite work? Any other suggestions on what you are cover your ramps with so you don't have issues

Thanks
Bob
 

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Any composite board material other than marine grade will not hold up.
Real wood or even rubber or plastic will be better.

Old tracks, conveyer belt, cow mats will do the job nicely and improve traction on the ramp.
 

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I used Garage trim from home depot fo my ski guides....went to a truck body shop for mud flaps and used those for the track mat.
 

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I have used the multi glides on the ramp on trailers at work and have used the center band out of a plastic 55 gallon drum on personal trailer. Ramps that use round tube aren't as bad for hangups but the carbides work on them and vise versa.
 

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Cool info.

My current tilt trailer has a V nose with fold down front rock shields so I can fold each one down and ride off.

I did pick up a a V nose, flat trailer with a ramp. It can hold three sleds. with one turned sideway at the end. Since I have short tracks, I might be able to get four sleds on sideways if I need to go that route. I doubt that will be needed much, as it is hard to get that many folks going at one time. Might sell the tilt trailer that holds 2 sleds, but will wait to see how the season goes. But right now, I have two new issues…..

1. I ordered some Caliber Grip Guides to protect the new deck lid. I assume I just need to space them out about every 10" as listed on the web site. But what do I put under the sleds tracks?

2. SNOW………. We are hurting on snow here in Oregon. Not sure if I get to ride at all this holiday season……. not sure you guys can help with that………..

Any other advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Bob
What brand of enclosed trailer do you have. I had a enclosed 30 years ago and they have come along way. Who makes a good trailer that is aluminum. Drive thru or non drive thru. We have two short tracks and a kitkat snowmobile. Thanks
George
 

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Start a new thread but really it depends on what you are towing with?
I have a 29' 6.6 tall 8.6 wide that I pull 6 sleds, with my GMC Cab over with a bunk house.
But I am building a 5 x 20 allum inline to pull with my VW TDI
 
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