Snowmobile Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys is it bad to leave your sled sit on the track all year round? I have had 4 wheelers and we never took the weight off the tires during storage. Is there something I am missing with this on snowmobiles? Mine is kept inside heated all winter long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
just throw a 2x4 or 4x4 or something under the rear handle. keep the track like an inch or so off the ground so the springs/shocks arent constantly compressed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
so am I hurting the shock by not lifting the sled? why dont people do this with 4 wheelers and dirt bikes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
IMHO....Yes, Not lifting the sled during storage can do damage. I just got both of mine out yesterday, Just to find my center shock blew a seal and leaked out a bunch of oil during the summer. So, I need to get the shock rebuilt, and buy another stand so I can have BOTH sleds properly stored.:(
 

·
I am Spartacus
Joined
·
23,863 Posts
I leave mine on a pallet all summer, although I probably should keep weight off the suspension. The springs will lose some of their pressure after a while if the sled is left on the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
i store mine on a sled lift and keep the whole thing off the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Personally I don't think it is all that important. All three of my sleds do NOT compress just sitting there. They are all at the upper limit of the suspension. You have to sit on the sled to get the suspension to compress at all. So the theory of the spring being under compression (in my case) just is not so. The suspension on these sleds are no different than on your cars, trucks, etc. They are engineered to be under load. The only advantage I can see to raising the track is if indeed the track is prone to dryrot, which I do not know.

I would invest in a grease gun and some good low temp grease before worrying about weight on the sled. But that's just me.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Good point steved28 there is barely any pressure on the shock or coilover. The track is fine sitting on the ground, it doesnt matter if it dries out as long as there is no mold or anything around that could rot the track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Yeah, hurting the shocks is not an issue here. The point is preventing track damage on concrete. Springs are always compressed unless removed. Shocks can sit idle in any position. If you've had shock leaking problems, it's probably due to the age of the shocks or how long it's been since they have been rebuilt.
 

·
"It's Only Money"
Joined
·
310 Posts
Here's my two cents just cuz I can. I lift the rear on a stand and also lift the front by blocking the belly frame. NO NOT support the front by the lift handle (if provided) for long periods of time. I knew a guy who did this. It buckled the sled from the frame forward (aluminum doesn't straighten well). Major repair and cost. The rear suspension isn't so critical as stated earlier, but the front does sit somewhat compressed depending on the setting. You'll never go wrong putting your baby to bed the right way, by getting her off the ground.;) OB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,512 Posts
Depends on your paddles too... I know that the 1.5 paddles that I put on my Panther tend to fold over when sitting on the ground. Not so with the .75 track on my other sled. I would think that the larger paddles would tend to take a "set" to them if left on the ground all summer.

The other good reason to prop the back is so you can tell your kids it's dangerous, and to stay OFF them! ;)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top