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Well, I went on a wolf hunt on the Denali HWY in Alaska and was worried about my Venture starting in the cold since I have had problems with it before. I think I found the solution since yamaha doesn't see a problem with a snowmachine that doesn't like the cold. Luckily there is a lodge that is open year round and they let us use there electricity to heat my engine and battery with a heat gun that we brought. So if you have any issues with your venture not starting in the cold just tow in a generator and a heat gun and within 30-45 minutes your yamaha will probably start. That was the first night. The second night I just let it idle all night because I didn't think it would start. The only problem I had after that is that the exhaust runs to the back which melts everything then it freezes to the track so all i had to do was flip the machine on its side and start wacking away with a shovel until my track broke free of the ice. Once we got off the Denali and loaded everything on the trailer for our 3 hour ride back north I just let it idle on the trailer until I got home.
 

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wooo..easy Farmaloose. Nothing wrong with Yamaha. And yes they do make good stereo equipment. Akhunter, sounds like a major pain in the butt. I have only had problems with my Phazers when the temp was down near zero. I agree with Yamaha440, enricher jets. Wow three hours idle on trailer.
 

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Alex
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It's a four stroke right?

If so, why don't you just get an array of heaters to run through the night instead of actually running it. Get a battery heater, coolant inline 'radiator' heater, and an oil pan heater. That would do a much better job of essentially what you were doing with the heat gun.

If yamaha doesn't sell them directly, theres a ton of aftermarket automotive products that would work. And I know Polaris sells most of these things for their FST's that would probably work too.
 

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The "block heater" available for small tractors will work well and make starting easier.
You can use a voltage inverter to power this when on the trailer and just plug in with an extension cord when available. Also a small portable generator will come in handy too.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's a four stroke right?

If so, why don't you just get an array of heaters to run through the night instead of actually running it. Get a battery heater, coolant inline 'radiator' heater, and an oil pan heater. That would do a much better job of essentially what you were doing with the heat gun.

If yamaha doesn't sell them directly, theres a ton of aftermarket automotive products that would work. And I know Polaris sells most of these things for their FST's that would probably work too.
My thing is I shouldn't need an array of heaters to start a machine that is made to ride in the snow, meaning cold weather. Also, it doesn't matter how many heaters I have on it, I live in Alaska, if I am out in the mountains hunting or trapping then I would have to bring a generator with me and that would have to run all night to keep the machine plugged in. Luckily this time I was staying in a lodge with electricity, next time may not be so lucky.
 

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Alex
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very good points.... forgot that in the picture you had a generator.

I don't quite know what to say other than go 2 stroke?! Four strokes are nice but tricky in the cold. Lucky it isn't a diesel.... then you'd have a ton of fun in the cold.
 

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very good points.... forgot that in the picture you had a generator.

I don't quite know what to say other than go 2 stroke?! Four strokes are nice but tricky in the cold. Lucky it isn't a diesel.... then you'd have a ton of fun in the cold.
That's another funny thing, my deisel truck sat in colder temperatures without being plugged in while we were out on the snowmachines for 3 days and when we got back it started right up, no problems.
 

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Keep in mind that the battery in your truck is much bigger and has more cranking power than the one in the sled.
It will not be effected by the cold as much as a smaller battery will be.
 

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My slam was just a joke guys, I like ALL sleds. what about one of the new small jump boxes they make, It could be carried on back of sled. also what does it use for oil? 5-30 full syn. may start It better or a Quick drain outlet to take the oil inside over night? a pain I know but could save you out on a trappin line.
 

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Alex
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switch to a thinner, full syn oil? Also, a larger battery or booster pack as mentioned.

And when I mentioned diesel... I was recalling our '69 Massey 175... so she has a few troubles starting in the winter if not quite heated up.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the suggestions but none of these solutions will work. I need this thing to start when I don't have any electricity available to plug it into, use a heat gun, take the oil inside, etc. I live in Alaska and it isn't like living in the lower 48. Some of the places we go riding are pretty remote with no electricity. On this last trip we rode our sleds for 80 miles just to get to where we were hunting. Pulling a generator in with me is just not feasable after I pack all my fuel, cold weather gear, food, etc in a tow behind sled. It is now for sale if anyone wants it. 700 miles, windshield bag, tank bag, passenger hand warmers. I'm going to look for a Skandic 550 fan.
 

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Alex
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I thought the good old skandic 550's were a bit more purpose built for this.... and the reason they kept them around.

Good luck with whatever you end up with. Can't imagine anything worse than being stranded 80 miles from the nearest anything.
 

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Another solution would be to use the exhaust from the other sled to warm up the engine.
You would only need some flexible hose/tubing that you can run from the outlet of the 2 stroke in next to the Yami engine.
 

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Well I'm as much a Yamaha fan as anyone here, but I think there is something wrong with the Venture if it won't start in the cold. I agree with AKhunter, if they sell the sled in Alaska it should be able to start.

Is the sled still under warranty, have you taken it in, and if so what did the dealer say?

What are the details on the no-start, does it crank but not start? Or does it not even turn over, or does it crank slowly? Did you pull the plugs, did it flood or foul the plugs? How is the spark?

If I had to guess I'd say get a brand spanking new battery and make sure it is fully charged, and change to a lower viscosity oil. I know that sometimes motorcycle electronic ignitions are sensitive to low battery voltage and they can crank but not start, because there is a very weak spark.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I took it to a different dealer than the one I bought it from and told them I was looking at trading it in. They took it in to give it the once over for trade in pricing. They said they couldn't find anything wrong with it, it has no recalls or service bulletins on it but they couldn't get it to start. I started it at the house in -10 after a few attempts, loaded it on the trailer and drove the 15 miles to the dealership and it didn't start when I got there. They pulled it in the garage to warm it up and after a couple hours it started. There suggestion is to get a cold weather kit put on it (engine block, battery, coolant, oil pan heaters). Still not a fix. They offered me $4000 trade, way too low. Went to the only Ski-doo dealer within 250 miles and no Skandic 550 fans, only the Tundra 550 fan.
When I try to start it, it tries to crank but just won't get going. I'm just going to chalk this one up to an expensive lesson learned for 4-stroke sleds and try to sell it then wait for a Skandic 550 fan to come in.
 

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Cold here too

AKHunterNP, cold here in Glennallen too. I have resorted to taking the batteries out and keeping them in the tent or cabin. Anything below -15F. Its not the machine its the batteries. They just don't have enough cold crank amps for the amount of compression these machines have. I have an 05 Vector Mountain with 5500 miles on it and my wife's 08 Phazer with 2000 miles on it. I struggled my first couple of years then got smart and took the battery out at night when I was out camping. I know its a pain in the ass, but having been standed out at Tangle Lakes at -40F was no fun. I will never trade my Yammies. They run like a charm and are soooo smooth.
Hey folks you gotta remember where AKHunter and I ride there may not be electricity for miles and it warms upto -30F.
 

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I have a 2015 Venture that has given no end of starting problems. Last week I fried the starter trying to get it going in minus 25C Temps. I was adhering to the 10 sec. max starter on limitations, minute off. I don't feel now that Yamaha has appropriately made this sled for the North American climate. I will be looking at selling it and going Bombardier.
 

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Just about all of these problems can be solved with a different oil and stronger battery. If your oil is like glue, it's very hard for that engine to turn over. Wonder why it starts when warm? Simply because the oil can actually flow. Yamaha makes a fully synthetic 0W40 specifically for this. The batteries are crap. Get one with the highest output possible. And yes, those booster packs work wonders!
 
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