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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey Guys,

I'm new to the sledding thing, I originally picked up a 1996 Yamaha Vmax 600 sled to use as an access sled for skiing... but I've gotten hooked on the sledding and am looking to get something a little more fun. I don't want to high mark or set any land speed records, but I want something I can explore the mountains on (I'm mainly in the Revelstoke BC area)

I'm trying to find a sled in the 3000-6000 range but as I look I realize I have no idea what I'm looking for, I've done lots of research on the internet on the various makes and models but I don't know what a good amount of miles/km on a sled is, or what an ideal track length is, or really anything.

Currently I'm looking at a few sleds and wondering if any of them seem like a good place to start:

-2006 skidoo summit rev 800 with 4100 miles on the chassis and 100 miles on a new OEM short block from BRP, replaced all seals and gaskets, brake fluid, coolant, chain case oil, all new motor mounts by a good dealer. (Asking $4200)

- 2010 Ski-Doo Summit X 146 with 3620km (Asking $6200)

- 2005 Ski-Doo Summit 1000 162 with a brand new top end with no hours, but he doesn't know how much use the sled has (he estimated around 60 hours total prior to new top end) (Asking $4200)

- 2008 Ski Doo Summit 800 X 154 with 6000km on body and 1500km on second motor. (asking $6000)

Any advice, or any sled suggestions, would be greatly appreciated.

And if anyone happens to have a sled with an ~$6000 value I also have a 2001 ford explorer sport trac I would like to trade (+ or - some cash) for a decent sled.

Thanks,

Colby
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Its not that I like ski doo, just seems to have the most sleds in the price range I've been hoping for.

I honestly have no personal preference as I haven't ridden anything...

I've heard great things about Artic Cats and newer Polaris sleds, but some people have said newer yamaha's aren't anything special.
 

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Yamaha 4-stroke mountain sleds struggle because of the excessive weight. The other three manufacturers all make great mountain sleds. A Polaris IQ 600 RMK from 2007 and up would be a great sled to learn on but not so intimidating because of power. The 2007 and up 700 is also a good sled, 800's have had issues over the years. Arctic Cat's M7's are very capable mountain sleds, and of course, your Canadian Skidoos.

I would look at what your friends are riding, as there's nothing like having some good advice and help when things break. You can also borrow their specialized tools when necessary. A helpful dealer would also weigh in on the sled to look for; dealer support shouldn't be overlooked, even if you do all the work yourself.

Welcome to the forum! Enjoy your search. If there are opportunities to ride before buying, take them; some sleds just don't fit all riders. I was very uncomfortable riding the Skidoo REV platform when it first came out, and only knew that after I test drove one for a bit.
 

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Id say go for the 2010 Summit, it really depends on what condition each sled is in and what conditions your going to be riding in.
 

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Seems you like ski-doo. Have you considered any other brand? How deep of show?

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And what, do you have something against the SkiBOOMs? Naw, I keed. I don't really have a preference in brand, I just buy for who was making the best sled in the time period that I'm looking at. In my case, early to mid 90's arctic cats were great sleds, then when i was looking for late 90's-early 2000's skidoo was the best.
 

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Haha I don't mind em. I put polaris on top, and all 3 on the same level below polaris. I know most about them, and every manufacturer had ups and downs. I think the new Yamaha's make good trail sleds, but definitely not mountain sleds.

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Recommend that you find out which local dealer is the best to work with. We had a local Arctic Cat Dealer who was excellent as far as his knowledge and work but when your machine sits in the shop for +3 weeks each time you take it in compared to the local Polaris Dealer who did a top end rebuild for me starting at 8:30 AM and had me back out on the snow by 1:00 PM with same quality work, it's something to think long and hard about. All of the top three manufacturers build a pretty good machine but the dealer can make or break your experience. Personally I'm a Polaris fan and have been that way since the 4 hour top end rebuild.
 

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Scares me that all of those sleds have either been rebuilt or replaced engines.

I used to be pretty neutral when it comes to makers, but between Arctic Cat, Skidoo and Polaris, I've had terrible luck with Polaris. Have 3 Polaris's in my yard that I wouldn't trust past the end of my driveway at this point. I'll tear the XLT down and figure it out, could be just age. The two cats I have a broken because they were ridden by idiots. Three skidoos all work fine.
 
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