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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. Just finished summerizing my ‘21 Polaris Indy LXT. I tried to do everything per the owners manual, and one thing it mentioned was removing the drive belt for the off-season, as it could cause oxidation on the sheaves of the clutch. My question, I removed the belt and left the clutch spreader tool in the clutch, as taking it out would close it up. Is this a big deal? Or should I back it back and close the clutch up even though there’s no belt in it? Still new to this, so this may seem like a dumb question.

I appreciate the help, thanks guys.


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I have never removed the belts for the summer. I like to start my engines monthly and running a snowmobile engine without the belt can lead to issues (if you rev up the engine and the clutch sheaves slam together, you can grenade the clutch.)

If I were to remove the belt, I would also remove the tool. It only takes a few seconds and would take tension off of the secondary spring. Allowing the sheaves to close fully won't hurt a thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have never removed the belts for the summer. I like to start my engines monthly and running a snowmobile engine without the belt can lead to issues (if you rev up the engine and the clutch sheaves slam together, you can grenade the clutch.)

If I were to remove the belt, I would also remove the tool. It only takes a few seconds and would take tension off of the secondary spring. Allowing the sheaves to close fully won't hurt a thing.
I will remove it for sure then, thank you!

I definitely wasn’t planning on running the sled with the belt off, but that’s good info to know.

I appreciate it.


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Welcome
Running a 2 stroke with out the belt will let it run away!
It happened to me back it 82 and pulling the plug wires did nothing!
I had to rip the air box and cover intake with my hand and it left a bruise!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey guys, one more question about removing this belt.

I removed the belt a couple months ago, then after recommendations from you guys I also removed the belt removal tool.

One thing I noticed when I did this though that didn’t really concern me at the time but now has me wondering.. the owners manual as well as videos on YouTube showing how to do this say to turn the driven clutch counter clockwise a quarter turn to make sure it’s not in reverse. I know for a 100% fact mine wasn’t in reverse when I shut it off. However, the driven clutch on mine doesn’t move a bit. It’s rock solid. Would having the parking brake on do this? Seems the guys in the videos were able to turn theirs before applying the parking brake. What will spin though is the back portion of the driven clutch. Not sure how big of deal that is for that to move one way or another. I didn’t sit there and spin it around, but it was able to move. Will even the smallest movement of this mess up any sort of adjustment or is this not a huge deal?

If anyone can ease my concerns on this, I’d appreciate it.

Maybe I should just leave the belt on next year? Not exactly sure what could cause oxidation like the owners manual says, but just doing what it says.

Thanks guys.


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The secondary is usually attached to the jackshaft. The brake disc is also usually attached to the jackshaft. If the brake is set, the jackshaft can't move so the secondary can't move. Without the brake set, a bit of movement back and forth is possible, as the movement takes up slack in the chaincase. With the brake set, the fixed sheave can't move, but the moveable sheave will move a small amount.

Just make sure you are going forward before you take the belt off and all will be good. If you are going in reverse when the engine stops, the rollers in the secondary may have traveled up the reverse side of the helix ramp and that may cause issues. Moving the secondary counter-clockwise before belt removal insures that the rollers are on the forward side of the helix in the secondary before belt removal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The secondary is usually attached to the jackshaft. The brake disc is also usually attached to the jackshaft. If the brake is set, the jackshaft can't move so the secondary can't move. Without the brake set, a bit of movement back and forth is possible, as the movement takes up slack in the chaincase. With the brake set, the fixed sheave can't move, but the moveable sheave will move a small amount.

Just make sure you are going forward before you take the belt off and all will be good. If you are going in reverse when the engine stops, the rollers in the secondary may have traveled up the reverse side of the helix ramp and that may cause issues. Moving the secondary counter-clockwise before belt removal insures that the rollers are on the forward side of the helix in the secondary before belt removal.
That’s good to know, thank you.

I do know for a fact that the sled was NOT in reverse when the engine was shut off. So if I did move it, it shouldn’t hurt anything then. No timing issue or anything?

Thanks!


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The way reverse works on your sled is that the electronics retards the engine and keeps retarding it until it stalls, then the electronics and timing kicks in and the engine spins backwards. Two-stroke engines don't care which direction they are turning, they will work equally well either direction.

There is a dual ramp helix in the secondary. the rollers inside the secondary roll one way for forward and the other way for reverse. If the rollers did not roll up the ramp, the sheaves of the secondary could not move toward each other to squeeze the belt. The reverse ramp is smaller than the forward ramp (to limit speed in reverse) and if the engine stops while the rollers are in the reverse position and you try to take the belt off, it can mess up the insides of the secondary.

It's always entertaining to watch when the reverse button is pushed and see your engine about to stall, then start spinning backward. I'm always amazed by it, even though I've had a sled that has PERC for 15 years ;) (It doesn't take much to amuse me these days!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The way reverse works on your sled is that the electronics retards the engine and keeps retarding it until it stalls, then the electronics and timing kicks in and the engine spins backwards. Two-stroke engines don't care which direction they are turning, they will work equally well either direction.

There is a dual ramp helix in the secondary. the rollers inside the secondary roll one way for forward and the other way for reverse. If the rollers did not roll up the ramp, the sheaves of the secondary could not move toward each other to squeeze the belt. The reverse ramp is smaller than the forward ramp (to limit speed in reverse) and if the engine stops while the rollers are in the reverse position and you try to take the belt off, it can mess up the insides of the secondary.

It's always entertaining to watch when the reverse button is pushed and see your engine about to stall, then start spinning backward. I'm always amazed by it, even though I've had a sled that has PERC for 15 years ;) (It doesn't take much to amuse me these days!)

Especially since I’m a beginner with all this snowmobile stuff, this is very good info.

Nothing worse than doing exactly what the directions say to do, then it not work the way it’s explained and now thinking you’ve messed something up.


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Been there, done that. We're very patient around here with new folks, we were all in your shoes one time or another!

Understanding how your sled works is always a good thing, as then you can do troubleshooting when things go wrong. (and maybe even fix the thing without having to take it to the shop!) The new electronic fuel injection with all the sensors and technology put a big damper on that, though. Fortunately, the new stuff seldom has problems!
 
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