Snowmobile Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, kind of a dumb question here.

Putting my belt back on my Indy LXT from summer storage, getting it ready for the winter I’ve only done this a couple times, and it made me wonder, when I install the clutch spreader tool and open the driven clutch, obviously it spreads it open, allowing me to put the belt on. Once I get the belt on, it’s pretty loose obviously, but stays that way even when I remove the tool.

The questions I have are, 1) how far can I/should I turn the tool in and spread the clutch open before it’s “too” far and can cause damage? Just makes me nervous as I turn the tool and makes these creaky noises as if I’m doing damage or something to it.

And 2), the belt is obviously loose once installed. Is there anything I should check before I call it good? I mean, will it seat itself and position itself correctly once I engage the throttle? If that makes any sense?

Still new to all this if u can’t tell.

Appreciate the help as always

Thank you


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
19,576 Posts
When I reinstall the belt on a sled with the Team secondary, after opening the secondary enough to get the belt on, I try to work the belt out to the edge of the secondary as far as possible. When the belt is really loose, the primary has to really be spinning to engage, and you can make a flat spot on the belt with the primary before it engages enough to start moving the secondary.

Having clean primary sheaves helps that. Having sheaves coated with rubber residue will make it worse.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys I appreciate it.

So if I’m understanding correctly, it won’t technically “fully” seat itself until the primary is engaged when I give it throttle? I thought I remember the salesman saying the belt had to be flush with the outside of the secondary when in position. I don’t think mine has been. It seemed to operate fine though?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
19,576 Posts
After the sled has moved forward and then stopped normally, the belt should be riding just a little proud of the outside of the secondary. If it's down below the outside of the secondary, that could indicate a worn belt or a secondary that requires adjustment. You want the belt to be at the highest position possible on the secondary, as that represents the greatest amount of "leverage" or ratio for the secondary. If the belt sits down in the secondary, it could be like starting your car in second gear; things slip and are boggy until you get up to speed.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I took a pic this morning of the belt.



This was after I installed the belt, and engaged the throttle and drove it 2-3 yards with the skis on the dollies. The sled has less than 30 miles on it and the belt appears to be in perfect shapes as you would imagine at that mileage. I just would assume with the lack of use on this that the belt wouldn’t get out of adjustment that quick? And if so, would actually riding it make it better?

Appreciate all your help.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
19,576 Posts
If you can prop the back of the sled up on a stand, give the engine a few burps to get the track up to speed to see if the belt rides up in the secondary. This is best done with the skis planted against a wall or curb or something unmovable.

Is that the Polaris roller clutch? I know they used a roller between the P85 button and going to the Team... I've never worked on the Polaris roller, it's not very common. I never had a sled with one on it.

What's the belt deflection? If the belt has the right amount of deflection, it could be the belt is too short or the center to center on the clutches is off. A short belt will not ride out all the way, even if the secondary is set up properly. It could be a manufacture issue, not all belts with the same number are the same length. Or maybe that belt is not the most optimal for that sled. Check numbers on the belt to see.

I would ride it to see if you have any off-idle bog. Also, take a sharpie and mark a line on the primary sheave from the center out to the edge. When you ride, hit full throttle to see if the primary fully shifts out. The line should be mostly rubbed off by the action of the belt after riding. But sled performance will dictate if you need to pursue any "repairs".. it may run fine the way it is, even if you are leaving a bit of performance on the table.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you can prop the back of the sled up on a stand, give the engine a few burps to get the track up to speed to see if the belt rides up in the secondary. This is best done with the skis planted against a wall or curb or something unmovable.

Is that the Polaris roller clutch? I know they used a roller between the P85 button and going to the Team... I've never worked on the Polaris roller, it's not very common. I never had a sled with one on it.

What's the belt deflection? If the belt has the right amount of deflection, it could be the belt is too short or the center to center on the clutches is off. A short belt will not ride out all the way, even if the secondary is set up properly. It could be a manufacture issue, not all belts with the same number are the same length. Or maybe that belt is not the most optimal for that sled. Check numbers on the belt to see.

I would ride it to see if you have any off-idle bog. Also, take a sharpie and mark a line on the primary sheave from the center out to the edge. When you ride, hit full throttle to see if the primary fully shifts out. The line should be mostly rubbed off by the action of the belt after riding. But sled performance will dictate if you need to pursue any "repairs".. it may run fine the way it is, even if you are leaving a bit of performance on the table.
Honestly I’m not sure what clutch it is. It’s the first sled I’ve ever owned. I’ll give that idea a try, propping it up and revving the engine and see what that does. So basically, if it runs fine and I don’t notice anything unusual, it’s should be safe to say it’s probably alright then?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I got thinking too, does the clutch close the more you give it throttle? In other words, I throttled it just enough to get the sled moving. If I were to open it up and give it actual speed, would the clutch close further, therefore having that belt sit higher where it should be?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I got thinking too, does the clutch close the more you give it throttle? In other words, I throttled it just enough to get the sled moving. If I were to open it up and give it actual speed, would the clutch close further, therefore having that belt sit higher where it should be?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Never mind. After researching how these things work, I realize my temporary theory makes no sense.

But at the same time, when is a good time to measure/check belt deflection? After the sled has been ridden and the throttle has been opened up a little? If I prop the back end up and give it some actual throttle, THEN check it, should that be an accurate time to do it?

What confuses me is with this sled barely ridden, can it really be out of adjustment already?

Again, thank you for the help. This is starting to make some sense now.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
19,576 Posts
The secondary is closed by spring pressure. The primary is open by spring pressure. When the primary spins, the flyweights force the movable sheave in the primary closed, which pulls the belt into the secondary. The faster the primary spins, the more force the weights impart against the spring pressure and the more it pulls the belt into the secondary. As the front pulley gets bigger, the back pulley gets smaller and vice versa. That's the beauty of the system; it's a constantly variable pulley system that reacts to the exact force needed to keep the primary at the RPM necessary for best performance.

The amount the throttle is open doesn't matter, what matters is how fast the primary is spinning and the reaction of the secondary to the belt being pushed outward on the primary.

When the engine has been running and you stop, the idling primary should release all its force on the belt and the belt should be all the way at the bottom of the primary. At the same time, the spring on the secondary is forcing the sheaves closer together, which moves the belt outward. That movement can't happen very well unless the belt is moving, which is why propping the sled up and giving it some throttle may allow the belt to ride outward on the secondary when you throttle down.

A short or worn belt, a weak or broken spring, or a mis-adjusted secondary can all cause the belt not to get to the outer edge. But when that happens, there is usually a lot of "slop" in the belt. Secondaries are designed to be adjusted for belt wear. As the belt wears, the sheaves have to be closer together to keep the normal position in the secondary.

Your pic does not show a catastrophic problem. You should be able to see if the belt being down in the secondary is an issue or not after you give it a ride for a bit.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks BC Dan!! Really appreciate all the help man. It’s very helpful. I watched a few videos online describing how these clutches work and with that and all the info u provided, it’s making a lot more sense now.

Tomorrow, I’ll get the sled back out and throttle it for a bit with the back end lifted and then go from there.

I’ll report back tomorrow.

Thank you!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok so I throttled the snowmobile today and that was exactly it. The track is exactly where it is supposed to be.

Can’t say enough how much I appreciate all the help. Definitely learning a lot from this forum.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top