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I sealed the wood on my trailer with epoxy paint with "shark grip" added. Sure looks to me like bare wood would not last as long as something that has been treated... especially as wet as a sled trailer gets. If you paint, make sure to put something in the paint to make it so it's not so slick, or you will be falling down a lot ;)
 

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If it's a brand new trailer from a manufacturer, they are usually built with an already treated, water resistant plywood decking. If not, you will definitely need to put a wood preserver of some kind on it or it'll be shot in 2 winters or less. Another suggestion is, if the trailer doesn't have sliders that keep the carbides off of the decking, put some on. The carbides chew the crap out of the plywood decking. An effective cheap fix for this is an old truck box liner cut lengthwise into strips and tack em down with a few screws. If it's a tilt deck this makes unloading alot easier as well.
Cheers:cool:
 

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Yup. prolly treated plywood! X2 on the ski/carbide guides. Get a track mat if you have picks!
 

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Jaded said:
If it's a brand new trailer from a manufacturer, they are usually built with an already treated, water resistant plywood decking. If not, you will definitely need to put a wood preserver of some kind on it or it'll be shot in 2 winters or less. Another suggestion is, if the trailer doesn't have sliders that keep the carbides off of the decking, put some on. The carbides chew the crap out of the plywood decking. An effective cheap fix for this is an old truck box liner cut lengthwise into strips and tack em down with a few screws. If it's a tilt deck this makes unloading alot easier as well.
Cheers:cool:
Yes it is treated wood but would you recommend adding any other sealer? I'll get some sliders, will I need to put holes in the decking to install those or just staples? How do they attach?
 

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if its treated you do not need anything else, my trailer was built by me in 1991 and still has the original non treated 3/4" plywood on it, stored outside year round.

you screw the stuff to the plywood with drywall screws.
 

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truc0011 said:
Yes it is treated wood but would you recommend adding any other sealer? I'll get some sliders, will I need to put holes in the decking to install those or just staples? How do they attach?
If it's treated you should be good for a few years especially if you protect the deck from excessive wear and tear like the runners and studs on your track would do. Once the wood starts breaking up the moisture gets in and it isn't long before it expands and rots. I also suggest that when you park the trailer with the sleds on it, drop the front end of the trailer so the water drains off and doesn't sit there and penetrate.
As for attaching the sliders, upersleder suggested drywall screws which I agree would likely work perfect. Staples will pull out if the wood gets damp at all.:thumbsup:
 

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Coated deck screws mot drywall, they rust! Thompsons water seal even if it's treated! One thing I saw but haven't tried yet is the roll on bed liner stuff? I've seen it on bumpers even? tough stuff, just wonder how slick it would be with ice?
 

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sealing the deck, hmm i think that is personal preference as i think they use marine grade or ground contact treated plywood.
the biggest and best thing you can do is pick up a couple of glides to screw to the deck. they are not that expensive, mine came with stainless steel screws and a track mat.
one sled has picks and the other does not. the track mat i have has nubs on it an helps the one without picks load easier as the track does not spin on the deck from snow.
 

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kccats said:
Coated deck screws mot drywall, they rust! Thompsons water seal even if it's treated! One thing I saw but haven't tried yet is the roll on bed liner stuff? I've seen it on bumpers even? tough stuff, just wonder how slick it would be with ice?

If you want it to last get some marine fiberglass and add color to keep out UV and add washed/silicon sand for traction and it will last a very long tome.

You can get a 1 & half gallon of fiberglass for $70, some color for $5, and a bag of sand $5 only need a little bit and it will soak into the wood and the surface will be gritty from the sand. I used have a half gallon to coat a 8x20 trailer on the deck and as an undercoating on metal and wood.
 

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If you do not want to spend the money for a track mat, go to your dealer and get a junk track. Cut it into two pieces and screw it to the deck. This works great and if you have an approach problem, use another piece on the ground before the trailer. (this will eliminate the track spin you get when only the very end of the track is all that is touching)
 

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DaveMN said:
sealing the deck, hmm i think that is personal preference as i think they use marine grade or ground contact treated plywood.
the biggest and best thing you can do is pick up a couple of glides to screw to the deck. they are not that expensive, mine came with stainless steel screws and a track mat.
one sled has picks and the other does not. the track mat i have has nubs on it an helps the one without picks load easier as the track does not spin on the deck from snow.
I have that exact same set up with the easy slides and stud mat. Works great.
I,ve had my trailer for a few years now and the deck is still in great shape. I never used any sealer but i'm sure it would help.
 

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redneckracer79 said:
I work at Triton Trailers and we use the best marine grade wood we can get four our decks. I would go with ski guides and a track mat before anything else.
I use to work at Three Rivers Extrusion Company.We use to extrude the aluminum for Tritons trailers.
 

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redneckracer79 said:
I work at Triton Trailers and we use the best marine grade wood we can get four our decks. I would go with ski guides and a track mat before anything else.
:D Too funny, the trailer in my picture is a triton tilt-on/drive off model. i have had mine for 2 years and it is in great shape. the guides and mat were the best investment for it.
 

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If it's treated you should be good for a few years especially if you protect the deck from excessive wear and tear like the runners and studs on your track would do. Once the wood starts breaking up the moisture gets in and it isn't long before it expands and rots. I also suggest that when you park the trailer with the sleds on it, drop the front end of the trailer so the water drains off and doesn't sit there and penetrate.
As for attaching the sliders, upersleder suggested drywall screws which I agree would likely work perfectly. Staples will pull out if the wood gets damp at all.👍
I just picked up a Silver Lake deck and while standing up on it mounted yesterday it occurred to me that maybe I should do some initial waterproofing before the season starts. I figured maybe just a light Thompson's Water Seal coat would do the job. Does anyone do any kind of waterproofing to the plywood decking on your sled deck? What did you use? Any adverse effects? Also, what about mounting something to grip once you get up on the deck? I was thinking of maybe using the extra Super-Glide pieces I have and turning them sideways. Maybe slice them into smaller sections and spread them out at the back section of the deck.
 

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I coated two previous trailers with epoxy paint and added shark grip for traction. (falling on your rear is very un-graceful ;) ) Thompsons won't stand up very well, and not sure how much protection it will add to the manufactures plywood. With the cost of marine grade plywood, I felt additional protection was important. That plywood is SPENDY. Lowes lists it for $145/sheet for A/B doug. fir.
 

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I tried Thompson Water Seal and it lasted one season. Waste of time and money.

I put new deking on my old trailer a couple of years ago. I used exterior deck paint top and bottom. The epoxy paint that Dan used would hold up much better. I put Caliber ski and track runners on the deck. The ski runners have nibs built in so you do not slip when walking on the deck.

Amazon.com: Caliber Lowpro Grip Glides Standard Double Set 13384, 16-Pc : Sports & Outdoors

Snowmobile Trailer Ramp Traction Trax Grabber Sold in Pairs Great for all tracks | eBay
 
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