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At some point this summer I will rebuild my 2004 Yamaha SXV triple 600 but besides a screwdriver, I have no tools lol. Which tools will I need to go out and purchase? thanks
 

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Metric socket set.
10 mm wrench(s).
razor blade for cleaning old gasket material off (probably the most time consuming part of the job)
Probably 12 mm socket with swivel and extension. Could be Allen-wrench or Torx for the exhaust bolts too.


WD-40
RTV gasket goop.
Loctite

if you plan on pulling the motor, you'll need some bigger stuff for the engine mounts. Usually 17 mm. Almost guaranteed that you'll need a deep well socket and a open-end wrench in that size for the nuts/bolts.
 

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Metric socket set.
10 mm wrench(s).
razor blade for cleaning old gasket material off (probably the most time consuming part of the job)
Probably 12 mm socket with swivel and extension. Could be Allen-wrench or Torx for the exhaust bolts too.


WD-40
RTV gasket goop.
Loctite

if you plan on pulling the motor, you'll need some bigger stuff for the engine mounts. Usually 17 mm. Almost guaranteed that you'll need a deep well socket and a open-end wrench in that size for the nuts/bolts.
I’m just going to do the top end so I don’t need to pull the motor right?
 

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If the engine is over 10 years old you should replace the seals too!
Do yourself a favor
Get a good set of tools!
Yamaha is ALL metric, get complete open box wrench set as well as std and deep sockets
As for doing the top end, the jugs will at least need to be honed!
Auto Zone has a hone stone (NO BALL HONE) you can get as a loan a tool.
If you were close to me I would walk you through all of it!
 

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Having a torque wrench for the cylinder base bolts and head bolts is also a good idea. You may be able to borrow one of those from Autozone, as well. They charge you for the tool, then refund your money when you return it.

Harbor Freight has inexpensive torque wrenches, but their quality is hit and miss, especially on the cheap $20 wrenches...
 

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If the engine is over 10 years old you should replace the seals too!
Do yourself a favor
Get a good set of tools!
Yamaha is ALL metric, get complete open box wrench set as well as std and deep sockets
As for doing the top end, the jugs will at least need to be honed!
Auto Zone has a hone stone (NO BALL HONE) you can get as a loan a tool.
If you were close to me I would walk you through all of it!
So you consider it necessary to have the cylinders honed? As far as I know the engine has never had any work and close to 7k miles. Like Dan said below i probably should have the seals done but I really wanted to avoid completely pulling the engine out. It’s going to be a hell of a task trying to just do the top end. I don’t know a single thing about mechanics and I am a hit of a slow learner. I hope I don’t destroy my sled in the process of trying to figure it all out

edit: it was you that said seals not Dan, sorry
 

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any time you replace pistons you should hone the cylinders and get a good cross-hatch on them.
 

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Like Bear said. The cross-hatch helps keep oil on the cylinder walls and contributes greatly to long piston ring life. I even run a hone on the nikasil coated cylinders. The hone doesn't really touch the nikasil (that is some TOUGH stuff!) but honing does break up the oil glazing on the surface of the cylinder and brings back some of the factory cross hatch.
 

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Like Bear said. The cross-hatch helps keep oil on the cylinder walls and contributes greatly to long piston ring life. I even run a hone on the nikasil coated cylinders. The hone doesn't really touch the nikasil (that is some TOUGH stuff!) but honing does break up the oil glazing on the surface of the cylinder and brings back some of the factory cross hatch.
Is it a simple enough process for someone that isn’t mechanically inclined at all? Anyway I can majorly screw it up? Do you think it’d be better to bring the cylinders to a shop to do it for me?
 

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Yes it is very easy to hone cylinders, borrow the hone and while using it have someone spray some oil down the cylinders as well to keep them oiled enough. I was 8 when dad told me to go rebuild an engine by myself with no help from him and I did that. Just take your time and use the internet to ask questions or have a friend there to show you if you can.
 

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Pics take plenty of pics
Get several small containers for bolts and nuts, write on them where they are from.

Most of all remember we all started this way too, but YOU have the advantage of ALL OUR mistakes!
 

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I like using ziploc bags to put the bolts and small parts in, they close so when they get knocked on the floor the dang things don't go all over the place. Plus, you can write on them to tell you where they came from.

Ditto on the pics, especially if it's something you have not done before. You will rely on them more than you think!
 

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I like using ziploc bags to put the bolts and small parts in, they close so when they get knocked on the floor the dang things don't go all over the place. Plus, you can write on them to tell you where they came from.

Ditto on the pics, especially if it's something you have not done before. You will rely on them more than you think!
Thanks for all the advice everyone and Dan. I know to do the seals I’ll need to pull the engine out but if I can only get around to doing the top end, is it perfectly feasible to do without having to pull the whole engine out of the sled?
 

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Sure. Drain/remove the coolant (I use a small shop vac to do that, it makes less mess), then the rest is easy. When you pull the cylinders off, make sure the rods don't bang against the crankcase. What I will do is remove the head and the base bolts, then as I start to pull the cylinders away from the crankcase, I wrap the rod with a soft towel. That way the rod does not swing into the crankcase with the weight of the piston on it. It's always a great idea to keep a cloth wrapped around the rods any time the cylinders are off to prevent items (like the piston pin circlip) from falling into the bottom end. That can be a royal pain.
 

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I wouldn't hone it if it's a nikasil and cylinder is still within specs unless you get the super expensive diamond hone. If it's out of spec send them off and get them re-plated.
 
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