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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I pulled the suspension and replaced the springs and sliders, greased it, cleaned it up and added a bit of touch up paint. By the way, I placed the old springs (5k miles) against the new ones. The old spring had about 2" of permenant deflection (deformation) measured at the extended arm of the spring. I guess this shows that older springs do tend to relax.

That was the easy part. I found it particularily tough getting the suspension back in though. After getting it inside the track, I can't seem to get the 4 holes to line up with the suspension bolts. After working Saturday late on it, I removed the two rear spring retainers that hold the front extension arm of the coil springs. These were located right behind the front wheels. Once this was done, the suspension did relax such that the holes were closer to the bolts. I quit after that (too late and I ran out of beer). That said, am I on the right track (no pun intended)? I didn't have time to muscle it back together on Sunday. I'm thinking that there is some simple way to line up the bolts with the holes. I even had tried tyinf the suspension (front and rear) in a compressed state. That helped getting it into the track, but didn't help in aligning the bolts with the holes.
It sounds like it should be easy but it wasn't.
By the way, anyone take a look at those cool Ski-doo bee shirts with the bee flexing his muscle? I had to buy one this weekend. Pretty cool.
Thanks!
 

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harsh, i'll think about your problems now. Hmm, like i said it is easy but very labor intensive. I would say that it is nice to have another person to help you lift and grunt. There are no real tricks i can think of other than perhaps putting an all through the holes and getting the supension up there and wiggling it, grunting, swearing, drinking bear, repeat. I am sorry i can not be of much help here. I do it every year and every year it kicks my a$$.
 

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Alot of Ski-Doos require you to put the frontmost bolts in first, and work your way to the back. That way you can compress the front to get the back where you want it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys,
Spending a little time down here in DC on vacation but will try smallengineguys trick about pinnning the front bolts first. I'll let you know how it goes. Looking forward to Dec. 1 - Michigan trails open.
Regards...
 

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run a ratchet tie down strap over the arms and compress the suspension down works like a charm
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Right on!

You guys were right on.
I tried just about everything but I couldn't get it on. But I had pinned the rear before the front.

I ended up removing the middle wheels so I could remove the piece that guides the two rear coil spring arms. With the rear coil springs loose, I loosened the two rear wheels to give me as much slop in the track (first, I painted the screw threads that adjust the tension on the track, that way I could get the tension in the track pretty close when I put it all back together). I then loosened the middle spring pre-tension. With everything loose, I muscled the front end of the suspension up. I used a jack on one side (under the black A-frame) to help get allign the frame with the front holes. I then put the 2 front bolts in. Then I dropped the rear end and with a little force, I got the 2 rear bolts in place. Then I put everything back together, adding the pretension back to the middle shock, turning the cam that adjusts the pretension on the rear coil springs, putting the wheels back on, and adjusting the track tension (and allignment).

Note, I'm being specific here so that when I do hte same thing next year, I won't forget the sequence of events.

The wife is now happy that she can get the van back into the garage.

Thanks all.
 
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