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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm new to sleds. Just got a 1995 (?) Indy Sport 440 air cooled. Under the hood it says to lube the jackshaft. I think I know what the shaft is, just not how to lube it. Any input?

I think it's a '95 because of the 40th anniversary sticker on it.

Thanks,
Chad
 

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The primary clutch is on the engine, the secondary clutch is the other one and it is mounted to the jackshaft. The bearing grease nipple is behind the secondary clutch. Remove the bolt securing the secondary clutch and slide the clutch out (to the left when sitting on the sled). You will see the grease nipple sticking up on the bearing retainer. While you are in there, put some anti-seize compound on the jack shaft that you just exposed before sliding the clutch back on.

Also grease the track drive shaft bearing just below the secondary clutch. You may see the speedometer cable coming out of the same area.

The other jack shaft and drive shaft bearings (right side) are lubricated by the chaincase oil so make sure the oil level is to spec.

While you have the grease gun loaded with low temp grease, you may as well grease the front and rear suspension to displace any water.

A little prevention goes a long way.

Nice sled! I had a 1987 Indy Sport 340 and on a cold day, it would top out at 75 mph.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks.....

I've been getting all the grease zerks I can find. I will be sure to get those also.

Thanks,
Chad
 

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Some of the jackshaft bearings didn't have the zerks. There may be a small hole to insert a grease "needle" instead. If you don't see the zerk, look for the small hole. Either way, it needs some grease for long life.

You should also make sure the end of the jackshaft (where the secondary clutch rides) has a light coating of grease (or anti-seize compound) to make sure the next time you have to remove the clutch, it comes off easily.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll check when I get home.

I can't get grease in the lower zerks on the skis or the main shaft from the handle bars to the steering mechanism. I tried to take off the steering shaft zerk, but couldn't get a socket on it. The steering seems a little tight. Any ideas for this problem?

I will remove the secondary clutch and lube it up.

Thanks,
Chad.
 

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It may be very hard to reach the grease fittings. For example on my indy 500 instead of taking clutches off I bought a 6" rubber hose and connected it to my grease gun.:thumbsup: It takes 2 seconds to grease and you have to take nothing off. If they put a 90 degree fitting on it, there would be no issue. but why make it easy?:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lubed up.

Took the secondary clutch off, but no zerk. Did squirt grease by the speedo cable.

Can't get grease in the steering column zerk (behind carbs). Also can't take this zerk off, must be pressed and not threaded in.

Thanks,

Chad.
 

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FORGET WORK- I WANNA PLAY
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Took the secondary clutch off, but no zerk. Did squirt grease by the speedo cable.

Can't get grease in the steering column zerk (behind carbs). Also can't take this zerk off, must be pressed and not threaded in.

Thanks,

Chad.
Ya, I wanted to change mine to a 90 degree but couldn't take mine off either. I think they are compressioned on or something.
 

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On the jackshaft, look for a small hole and use a grease needle. If it doesn't have the hole, you can loosen the three nuts on the bolts holding the bearing "flangette" and pack the inside with grease. The OEM bearings are sealed both sides, so greasing doesn't put a lot of lube into the bearing, but it does keep the water out, which is probably more important.
 

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I have no clue what sled you have but to grease the zerk on mine I use a piece of gas line on the end of my grease gun and bend it tight to grease that one. Try that if you have the room.
 

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To remove the secondary, remove the belt, set the brake, use a 1/2" socket to take the clutch off. There will be spacers on the bolt holding the clutch on, and spacers behind the clutch. Make sure not to lose any, as that is how the clutches are aligned. The clutch should just slide right off.
 

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I Have a polaris indy 440 fan cool think is a 93. How many pumps of grease shood I punt in the track drive shaft baring.
Thanks
 

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The jackshaft bearing on the clutch side is also a shielded/sealed bearing. Polaris sometimes had a small hole for a needle or a zerk fitting on the bearing carrier but grease that is pumped into that fitting does not make it into the bearing. Adding grease may have the benefit of keeping out any water from around the outside of the bearing, but it does not lube the bearing. Some of the carriers had no means to add grease, as you have found.

Some guys will pull the shield off of the side of the bearing on the outside of the sled so some grease can get in there. The problem with that is too much grease put in by a grease gun will push the shield off the tunnel side of the bearing and can allow water to enter the bearing, which will cause premature failure.
 
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