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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, wanting to change the coolant on my snowmobile but have no idea how to empty it out and if there is a certain way you should put the fresh stuff in. I have heard that you should lift the front of the snowmobile up when refilling the coolant.
 

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When I change my coolant, I use a wet/dry shop vac and suck it out the filler. It gets most of it out with not a lot of drama. Sometimes you may have to crack a coolant hose.

When refilling, fill, then as you mentioned, get the front of the sled higher than the rear heat exchanger so the air pockets can migrate on their own to the filler. Idle the engine with the cap off until there is heat in the rear heat exchanger.. That should get most of the air out. Make sure you check it a few times on your first ride. It wouldn't hurt to take a bit of coolant mix with you on the first run, just to top off if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, so you are saying to suck the old coolant out and then let it run on idle with the filler cap off with no coolant. Do you just feel if the rear heat exchanger is hot by hand?
 

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No he is saying drain it via a wet/dry shop vac or a pump of some sort, then fill it back up as much as possible then either lift the front end up much higher then the rear exchangers then fire it up with the cap off letting idle for several minutes. You will see the air bubble slowly come out over time. Then for the 1st ride take a quart of it with you and stop and check it now and then by slowly cracking the cap letting the pressure off and check the level. Also when you fill it back up before running it to get the air bubbles out make sure the overflow bottle is to the full line as well.
 

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What Coolhand said.

If you idle it for 10 minutes and the rear heat exchanger does not get warm, that may indicate an air bubble is blocking flow from the water pump to the rear heat exchanger. Sometimes that happens. If it does, try tilting the sled slowly side to side to see if the bubble can work it's way out the fill. If the back is higher than the fill, the air will accumulate in the rear heat exchanger and cause overheating.
 

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I put mine up on hill at my parents house this past season when I had to do my sled. Worked great and only took a few minutes. Idk what ratio you plan on running but I run 60/40...60% coolant and 40% water as that is what Polaris factory calls for not that 50/50 isn't good enough, just easier for me to do it that way in case I am out on the trail and need coolant as most places up here carry Polaris Quart size coolant bottles and its 60/40. Normally I carry one quart of that and a quart of AMSOIL between the 2 sleds when we ride. Saves money while out on the trail.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Alright, thank you. Just to clarify I’ll pump all of the old stuff out, lift the front end of the sled up, fill it up with the new coolant, let it run with the filler plug off and make sure the rear heat exchanger gets hot.
 
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