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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I am new to snowmobiling. I drive a 2001 Polaris Indy 500. We are expected to get 7 inches of snow. This is our first snow fall of the year. Would I go out and be able to ride the trails with that much snow being we don’t have school on that day. Thanks for the help
 

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Half a foot and I'd be out for a ride but maybe not going everywhere I would mid winter. I'd be careful about any rough areas like fields or spots you might hit something.
Be careful, go slow when warranted.

Make sure not to ride too long on areas without snow cover as you start heating up the coolant without snow hitting the exchangers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, do you know if we have to wait for the trails to be groomed to ride on them. All the trail signs have been up since November.
 

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I'm not sure where you are, but here, there are designated snowmobile trails to keep other users from destroying the surface after it's groomed. But sleds can ride them (as can other users such as cross country skiers, snow shoers, dog sleds, even fat tire bikes, groomed or not. And the roads in the National Forest can be ridden whether they are designated or not, but usually are so torn up by 4x4's that you would not want to be on them.

7" is plenty for trail riding, but be aware... some times that 7" melts really quickly and if you head out for a longer trip, you may be looking at no snow coverage on your way back... make sure to check the weather!
 

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Our groomed trail systems are maintained by the provincial snowmobile association. The trails are still there and are open to snowmobiles from December to March annually through their lease on the crown land trail system and leased private property.

We can ride on them as long as there's snow but they're bit maintained until they determine snow cover is adequate.
 

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Trail systems may not be opened until they are groomed. If you ride when a trail system is not open then that could result in a fine from the DNR where you live. Doing so here in Wisconsin will cost you a pretty penny when doing that since it is illegal to ride until the trails are legally opened and groomed. So keep that in mind.
 

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Amen to that!

I find it interesting how the regs are different in the different States and Provinces.

Our grooming contract with the USFS and BLM specifies we can't groom until there is at least 6" of snow on the trail to prevent damage to the road surfaces, but with the steel grousers of the cat, I would prefer even more. But the only closures are to wheeled vehicles and side by sides. They get on the trails anyway and really tear it up. ALL our trails are multiple use for over the snow, which includes cross country skiers, snowshoers, dog sleds (not often, but sometimes! Those are cool to watch) and even fat tire bikes.) When the ruts are left by the 4x4s, it makes it impassable for most of the other users.

So it's up to the user to determine if they want to snowmobile on sketchy snow. And off trail is permitted as long as it is not causing resource damage, which is usually about 2 feet deep. Any less than 2 feet and there is a great tendency to hit things, bending A arms and seeing very creative ways to get back to the truck ;)
 

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Our trail system is small and unique - Most of our trail system was our former Railway line, which was shuttered in 1989. All of this property was provincially owned land. The province is only 200 miles across, so now all shipping is done by trucks and rails were obsolete. In the early 90's they removed the railway lines and converted the entire thing to crushed gravel trails. An amazing resource for walking, cycling through the summers, and then once there's snow, snowmobiles through to March 31st. Since it was crown land, the Snowmobile Association entered into seasonal lease of the trails for the winter, so that's our legal trail system. Other land owners signed on to allow passage on the sides of fields, which are marked and such.

Groomers work on all of the trails and we really only run into trouble when people start bombing around farm fields with low snow, tresspassing and ruining the ground. Since our province is so small, there's next to no un-used property, so almost all land is privately or crown owned, so if you're off the leased trails you're technically trespassing.

Wardens monitor the trails with checkpoints and such too. Used to be just volunteers on old crappy machines, but lately dealers have been donating brand new demo sleds for use for the season to the wardens, so you've gotta be lucky if you're driving illegally and they come after you. They can keep up!
 
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Discussion Starter #10
The weather changed and we are supposed to get about 7 or 8 inches of thick snow. Me and my friends are going to try some riding and if it gets too rough we will turn around. Thanks for the help.
 

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Idk where you live but remember if the trails are not legally open you can't be riding them in some states so take that into consideration
 
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