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Discussion Starter #1
When starting from a stop two of the sleds seem to engage very harshly. I have checked the belts and they look fine, very low mileage on them. Do I need to adjust the belt tension?
 

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A harsh engagement is better for the belt, there is less slipping. What RPM does the primary engage the belt?

I would start by cleaning both the primary and secondary to make sure there is not a bunch of belt residue built in the clutch. You can do a pretty good job of that with soap and hot water while they are on the sled. Make sure that there isn't a black ring built up on the inside of the primary. That is pretty common.

If you look at the belt riding in the secondary, most of the time, proper adjustment has the belt sitting just outside the secondary sheave. If the belt is flush or lower in the secondary, adjustment may help engagement.
 

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First off what year sled and model? And what do you mean they engage harshly? At what RPM's are the sleds engaging? Most sleds should engage around 3800-4400 depending on what spring you have in there, washers and weights.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
First off what year sled and model? And what do you mean they engage harshly? At what RPM's are the sleds engaging? Most sleds should engage around 3800-4400 depending on what spring you have in there, washers and weights.
2004 550Fan it is in my Sig.

I am comparing one to the others and the two that have issues have to rev higher before the clutch engaes and then the sleds "jolts" forward. The other engages at a lower RPM and no big jolt.
 

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Too harsh of an engagement may be caused by sticky or worn parts in the primary. The sled moves forward when engine RPM causes the centrifugal force of the flyweights to overcome the stationary force of the primary spring. If the weights are sticking or if the moveable sheave is sticking, or if the weights are "notched" the sheaves engage the belt quickly. If you're racing or want maximum acceleration, this is desirable. If it's annoying, start with making sure the flyweights are not sticking and that the clutch is clean and operating properly. A quick engagement can be easier on the belt, as there is less belt slippage, but if it's too harsh, it gets annoying pretty quickly on a long day.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All sleds are low mileage so it would surprise me if anything is worn but sticking is a definite possibility. I didnt see anything in the manual about lubricating the flyweights. How do I check if they are sticking?
 

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There is no lubrication on the flyweights. Sometimes belt dust will get between the weight bushing and the body, which can cause them to slow down a bit. That is why cleaning is a yearly ritual. To do it properly, it's best to get the primary off the sled, which can be a pain if it's not been done in a while. I pull the primary and remove the cover and that allows me to remove the spring. Once the spring is out, you can check weight movement and main bushing movement easily.

If you don't want to do that, clean the primary while it's on the sled. I use Simple green and a green scotch brite pad and then rinse it down with hot water to remove the cleaner. Cleaning this way is not as thorough as disassembly but often will be adequate to make sure the clutch works properly.
 
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