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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was riding along the other day with a couple of guys and we stopped for a little break. As i slowed down the sled started to bog and then died. Then of course it wouldnt start. Well i found out the primary clutch was stuck and still grabbing the belt. This happened last year also. So come to find out last year the weight rollers got stuck and eventually got worn through by the weights. So I replaced the weights and rollers and pretty much the whole clutch. Well same thing again. rollers are worn through and the weights are still good thank god. But the big UH OH! When threading in the clutch puller it somehow cross threaded and stripped out the threads. Now i am screwed.

So i decided to stop working on the clutch for the time being and lifted the sled to replace some worn out studs. Well come to find out I lost 3 suspension bolts. Last year I trashed a whole suspension this way. They came loose and wore large holes in the rails. Now it has already started on the new suspension. Then as i sit there and look at the sled i notice something dripping. Oil. dont know how or where. I had the motor out 2 months ago and replaced the rings and all of the filters and stuff.

and then... i smell gas. Yup, leaking from somewhere.

Now before anyone says you need to learn how to maintain that sled, dont worry, suspension bolts are tightened every week, Clutch is lubricated the same. I pretty much go through the sled and do a check on everything every week. I wish now that I wouldnt have spent this kind of money to fix the sled up. Otherwise i would get rid of it and get a new one. But now i might need to if i cant get the clutch off. This is really pissing me off, especially right in the middle of riding season. Last year I got 2000 miles even with the problems and this year is looking more like 500... which is how many i have so far.

so really does anyone have suggestions to why the clutch might eat up rollers like this? or how can i get the thing off the sled. Or anything. I like this thing to much to get rid of it but i need to solve these ongoing problems. It is getting to a point where I just dont want to have this kind of down time.

sorry for the long post.
 

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Tap out the clutch with the next biggest fine thread tap you can use. then get a grade 8 bolt, and a piece of hardened steel rod to make up the length you need to get pressure to the PTO. Use the puller to guage this by. Then lube the threads and friction pionts up with moly lube, tighten it up and smack the bolt with a hammer. That clutch will be in the belly pan. As far as suspension bolts, always use blue Loctite on them, they will never pull loose.
 

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He just said every week before that...(so he means every week)
 

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I want to know EXACTLY what he means by saying he "lubricated" his clutch, I understand that he does it every week. But, you are not supposed to lubricate your clutch, and that might be the source of his clutch problems, hence my query. rollinredcavi, how do you lubricate your clutch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
sledneck27 said:
I want to know EXACTLY what he means by saying he "lubricated" his clutch, I understand that he does it every week. But, you are not supposed to lubricate your clutch, and that might be the source of his clutch problems, hence my query. rollinredcavi, how do you lubricate your clutch?
Comet clutch lube. Graphite lube. Sprays on, dries almost like a spray paint. If you have never seen this stuff you should find some.
 

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OK, good. I just wanted to make sure that you were not using a wet lube. While it is better than using oil for instance, I still wouldnt use dry lube either. Dry lube can build up and cause binding too. I have NEVER lubed any clutch with anything, I've just made sure that its dry and clean, and I have had 1000's upon 1000's of troublefree miles, as far as primary clutches are concerned anyways. Check over your clutch for dry lube build up at the friction points.
 

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Comet clutch lube will cause more ware as it builds up and causes binding. If you insist on lube CRC makes a heavy duty clear silicone lube that dries to the touch in 30 sec. It too will cause build up in the long term but less than the graphite stuff. I would say that if you disassembled and cleaned the clutch after every long ride (more than 500 miles) than you could use as much lube as you wanted as you would clean it off regularly. Thus no build up would occur.
However if you did the recomended maintenance you would'nt need any lube at all.If you think about it, there isn't any thing in the drive clutch that benifits from lubricants. All of the moving parts are bushed with fiber type bushings. Most lubricants will soften this material. This will cause premature failure. Thats why all manufactures say "No Lube".
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well i have done it both ways and had to replace the whole clutch the first time and then the rollers and stuff the second time.
 

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Frosty said:
Comet clutch lube will cause more ware as it builds up and causes binding. If you insist on lube CRC makes a heavy duty clear silicone lube that dries to the touch in 30 sec. It too will cause build up in the long term but less than the graphite stuff. I would say that if you disassembled and cleaned the clutch after every long ride (more than 500 miles) than you could use as much lube as you wanted as you would clean it off regularly. Thus no build up would occur.
However if you did the recomended maintenance you would'nt need any lube at all.If you think about it, there isn't any thing in the drive clutch that benifits from lubricants. All of the moving parts are bushed with fiber type bushings. Most lubricants will soften this material. This will cause premature failure. Thats why all manufactures say "No Lube".
The lube will also collect belt dust - which is the number one killer of clutches.
 
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