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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys i am planning to do my first mountain trip next year for my grade 12 graduation, there will be like 6 of us and we all wanna know how much the average price will be for 3-5 days of riding?
We cant decide whether to rent or to bring our own sleds...
2006 M7 LE
and 3 2006 Renegade 800
:dunno::dunno::dunno:
 

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You probably want a 144" track,, and you will have to spend a bit to reclutch and rejet your sled.
Renting is nice but in grade 12 your credit cards will only have a $1000 limit so they may not be enough and there may be an minimum age limit on renting.(don't forget many want to give you an avalanche course too)
I'm a flatlander,, but a few buddies have done trips with their own sled, saying it's better than renting ,,
 

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Discussion Starter #3
my M7 is efi so jetting isnt an issue, we all have long tracks, the thing im worryied about is breaking down in the back country and not being able to get the sled back.
 

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I took my first trip out there a year or so ago. Was only a sophmore in high school. Took my Crossfire out there and it did pretty well. Only have 144 inch track with 1.25 inch lugs. Was at around 9000 ft and didn't re clutch at all. I think you should be fine with the m7 especially and, the renegades will do pretty well if you don't get into a ton of deep powder. Just my opinion!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
what kind of gear will i need?
why would the renegades need to be careful? they are 800ccs im only a 700. we all have 151/153 i think
 

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Mountain riders benefit from having a pack to carry a shovel and avalanche probe, as well as having a beacon on them. Some are moving to avy air bags, just in case. A good metal shovel is a must; if you have to dig someone out of an avalanche, the snow is like digging the stuff on the side of the road the snow plow left. It is NOT light and fluffy and will laugh at plastic and inferior shovels. Get a good shovel with a saw in the handle. You may be amazed at how many times the saw can come in really handy.

Knowing how to use the beacon/probe is a great idea, there are some pretty good online classes you can go through before you head to the high country. This is one of the better ones I have seen online; the best avalanche safety is avoiding the terrain when the danger is high. Knowledge is the key!

Online Avalanche Course : Training : Canadian Avalanche Centre : avalanche.ca

You may want to plan on extra gas, unlike the east, there won't likely be many gas stations (or restaurants or bars). To maximize your riding, you may want to carry gas to extend your day.

Carry water/food/fire starters/survival supplies in your pack. They can make a big difference if you get separated from your group, or if something breaks and you need to spend some time out. Having a SPOT is a great plan, cell coverage is very 'iffy' in the mountains. Garmin makes a GPS which is great for riding; the RINO has a GMRS/FRS (General Mobile Radio Service/Family Radio Service) radio to communicate with pretty good range, and peer to peer locating of other RINO radios in the area. You can locate other RINO-equipped wayward team members pretty easy with the latter feature.

Carry a spare pair of gloves and socks, if you are working hard, your hands and feet will get really sweaty. Wet gloves and socks will make you feel the cold a lot more. Wool socks are a must, with a lightweight "wicking" sock under them.

There's a lot of stuff listed, some is pretty spendy. Where you ride may have rental places that you can rent some of the more expensive stuff, which could save you some cash.

Have fun!
 

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Google is your friend ;)

Avalanche Safety Rental | Avalanche Beacon Rental

You will have to determine where you want to ride, then locate a rental shop. You can buy good used and very functional equipment on ebay, but even a cheap beacon will be a hundred bucks.

I can't stress the beacon enough; we had an experienced snowmobiler riding in central Oregon this year that was caught in an avalanche, he was not equipped with a beacon. He was found relatively quickly; two hours from the time of the avalanche until he was located by probe line by Search and Rescue. You're pretty much going to suffocate if they don't get you out of the snow within a half hour.

Even if everyone has beacons, a lot of fatalities are caused by trauma as the sled and rider get trashed down the hill by a couple hundred tons of concrete-like snow. The beacon will never be a substitute for good judgement.

A group new to riding mountains without experience in how to avoid the danger and what to look for and not having any gear is a disaster waiting to happen. That would really suck to start with 6 and bring back 5. Come prepared, ride safe, make it home.

That's my mantra, too! :D
 
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