Snowmobile Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Clutch on my '92 Exciter II started acting up, it no longer shifts. I took the shroud off and found the damage in these photos.

Not sure what broke loose but it even caused slight damage to the outer secondary.

Am I beyond purchasing a rebuild kit for this since the sliding sheave has been damaged and is probably out of balance?

I haven't done an ounce of maintenance on this sled(4k Miles) so this is probably all my fault.

Thanks In Advance,
-12vman
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
Rebuild kits consist of bushings, spring, and maybe even weights (depending on the kit). You've physically damaged the outer sheave of the clutch, and that will impact the balance of the clutch.

You're going to need to either replace that part of the clutch, or buy another whole clutch (used) and rebuild -it-.
 

·
Sled Of The Month Judge
Joined
·
2,841 Posts
It would be best to find a used clutch. The sliding sheave, cap, and spider are all balanced together. You would also need special tools to take the sliding sheave off the spider, namely a specific clutch holding fixture, and a spider wrench to separate the spider from the fixed sheave. The spider is also held on with red locktite and torqued to over 140 ft lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
The spider is considered for balance, but its impact is very small. When you re-shim, you actually change the position of the spider relative to the other two pieces so as to keep the other pieces more closely aligned.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,737 Posts
basically lack of maintenance got that one. appears as though the bushing in one of the weights finally got tired and said goodbye or it could have been partnered with a roller. lucky you didnt do more damage.

may have a good one of those if your interested. from there look into a comet 108 as a replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok so what is going to be the best option?

I don't want to sink a lot of money into a 20+ year old sled.

If I find a complete used clutch on ebay can I swap it out without too much difficulty? I have never pulled a clutch.

It seems that this clutch if fairly common.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
I would suggest you either buy a cleaned and rebuilt clutch from a clutch builder or spend less money on a plain "used" clutch and then have it rebuilt / cleaned. It will end up costing you a couple hundred dollars when you're done, but you'll be back on the trails. Keep your current clutch for some spare parts, see if it is of value as partial trade for the one you buy, or sell it off to someone else that can use the non-broken parts on it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,737 Posts
to swap the clutches, you just need a puller specific to that clutch to remove it. same one on that clutch from about 84 to present. having lack of maintenance may create a bit of a battle in removal, guessing it hasnt been off for some time.

what you will find between clutches is a calibration and sheave angle difference. sheave angle doesnt factor in near as much as the calibration. if your sled worked well prior to disintegration, you will want to tune it as it was. you will need to use the same weights and verify roller diameter. weights new will set you back around $40, each, x 3.

problem with buying used items is condition. you may end up having to rebuild. there are wear parts in a clutch. bushings in the rollers and weights, cap bushing and sliding sheave bushing. those parts alone can total plenty. be wary.

its a tough call on a sled that old, but it comes down to how much you like the sled and your desire to ride. sled is basically worthless when its inoperable. toss a couple hundred bucks at it and you have basically rode that sled for pennies on the dollar. your ahead of the game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,163 Posts
to swap the clutches, you just need a puller specific to that clutch to remove it. same one on that clutch from about 84 to present. having lack of maintenance may create a bit of a battle in removal, guessing it hasnt been off for some time.

what you will find between clutches is a calibration and sheave angle difference. sheave angle doesnt factor in near as much as the calibration. if your sled worked well prior to disintegration, you will want to tune it as it was. you will need to use the same weights and verify roller diameter. weights new will set you back around $40, each, x 3.

problem with buying used items is condition. you may end up having to rebuild. there are wear parts in a clutch. bushings in the rollers and weights, cap bushing and sliding sheave bushing. those parts alone can total plenty. be wary.

its a tough call on a sled that old, but it comes down to how much you like the sled and your desire to ride. sled is basically worthless when its inoperable. toss a couple hundred bucks at it and you have basically rode that sled for pennies on the dollar. your ahead of the game.
If buying the same clutch, though, all of those parts transfer over. Bring your weights and primary spring to a pair of sheaves and a spider... And, with those parts pulled out, you can almost certainly blast the clutch with brake cleaner to get it fairly clean even if it isn't disassembled. The biggest thing will be to get the belt clearance set correctly if it's not where it needs to be - that has to be done by someone with the tools to remove the spider.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,737 Posts
the weight was toast on the picture i viewed. thats what went through the sliding sheave slider area, or parts of it.

basically hes down one weight, thats all you can see. if that one went, whats the condition of the other two and the rollers?

bad idea in my opinion to toss bad parts into good ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I found a clutch pulled from an 88 exciter with 3450 miles, inspected and good to go.

Trying to figure out if this will bolt on my machine.

When I compare the part numbers between 88 and 92 on the Yamaha Site,
there are a few differences. For example the Primary Fixed Sheave:

1988 - 82M-17611-00-00
1992 - 82M-17611-02-00

Is this anything to be concerned about?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,737 Posts
88 would be a ypz clutch after 91 would be the yxr clutch, like yours. two different clutches.

you can run the ypz clutch but you will need the bolt. may have to change the belt.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,737 Posts
correct, but the weights will be different.

thats what you need to consider with clutches. unless you buy one identical for your sled, the differences lie mostly with weights, rollers and springs. sometimes sheave angles as mentioned but thats usually not a deal breaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
basically lack of maintenance got that one. appears as though the bushing in one of the weights finally got tired and said goodbye or it could have been partnered with a roller. lucky you didnt do more damage.

may have a good one of those if your interested. from there look into a comet 108 as a replacement.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,335 Posts
Yamadad last posted in this thread in 2014 and has not posted on the forum in Dec of 2018. I would not expect a reply from him.

When I had a couple of Enticers back in the day, one of them needed a new clutch. I bought a Comet 94C Duster clutch for it and that clutch worked well. The Duster clutch is designed for lower HP machines and has pucks in it instead of flyweights. It may be worth your time to do a bit of reading on them to see if that may meet your requirements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,128 Posts
Welcome
Start your own thread with the troubles you are having.
As for finding a clutch go to the swap meets this fall!
Hay Days has everything!
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top