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Discussion Starter #1
Last season I bought a 1996 polaris Indy xlt 600 triple with no modifications. I had a bad water pump right off the bat and then when I replaced it I went for a ride and the temp light came on after 5 minutes. I opened the hood to no coolant so then I replaced all the lines, it held a little bit and didn't overheat but was obviously leaking somewhere. I replaced all the top end gaskets and it seems to still leak a little bit but it is much less. The radiators are good, no holes, dents or anything they seem to be perfect. I also pulled the motor to see if the head was cracked and it was fine. Does anyone have an idea of what could be going on?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Have you checked the head for warpage ? Using a piece of glass ?

Steve
I actually didn't do that. How much will it smoke if coolant is getting onto the cylinder/s? I will definitely look in the spring. Thanks for the suggestion


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Have you burped the system of air? Anytime you replace anything with regards to the coolant system you have to burp the air from the system. Raise the front end as high as you can get it i.e on a small hill or jack. Then make sure the coolant bottle is full and then pull the pressure cap on it start it up and let it idle up as it runs the air will start to leave the system from the pressure cap area and as it warms up it will drop just like a car. I am betting you have a bunch of air in the system and if you never burped it that is why the temp light is coming on. Can't just fill it up when it is empty and not do that otherwise you will end up this situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Have you burped the system of air? Anytime you replace anything with regards to the coolant system you have to burp the air from the system. Raise the front end as high as you can get it i.e on a small hill or jack. Then make sure the coolant bottle is full and then pull the pressure cap on it start it up and let it idle up as it runs the air will start to leave the system from the pressure cap area and as it warms up it will drop just like a car. I am betting you have a bunch of air in the system and if you never burped it that is why the temp light is coming on. Can't just fill it up when it is empty and not do that otherwise you will end up this situation.
I will do that. I did try to bleed the air out but i didn't bout the front end up, thanks for the help!
 

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Yep that front end has to be as high as you can get it as it needs to be higher then the radiators on both sides underneath the tunnel or it is just going to overheat again and the last thing you want to do on a XLT mono-block is overheat it. Best to do it with the cap off and not using the screw release if it has one, yes you can use both but with the cap off it works itself out slowly over a period of 10-15 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yep that front end has to be as high as you can get it as it needs to be higher then the radiators on both sides underneath the tunnel or it is just going to overheat again and the last thing you want to do on a XLT mono-block is overheat it. Best to do it with the cap off and not using the screw release if it has one, yes you can use both but with the cap off it works itself out slowly over a period of 10-15 minutes.
Thanks, this is good information to have because I heard that water pumps on xlts don't always last super long so I will have this in mind.
 

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They are no worse then others. Problem is people forget on Liquid Cooled snowmobiles there is still a belt underneath that recoil that drive said water pump system and they neglect them and then they get all pissy when their snowmobile goes boom from overheating. I check mine every year, takes 5 minutes to remove the bolts and look. I also keep spare belts hanging up for it, they cost a whopping 5-10 bucks on Amazon or eBay or even in regular parts stores. Very common belt and has been used forever on Polaris snowmobiles dating back to the mid '80s.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
They are no worse then others. Problem is people forget on Liquid Cooled snowmobiles there is still a belt underneath that recoil that drive said water pump system and they neglect them and then they get all pissy when their snowmobile goes boom from overheating. I check mine every year, takes 5 minutes to remove the bolts and look. I also keep spare belts hanging up for it, they cost a whopping 5-10 bucks on Amazon or eBay or even in regular parts stores. Very common belt and has been used forever on Polaris snowmobiles dating back to the mid '80s.
[/QUOTE
Makes sense I keep a spare as well. I got a brand new one last year, what point is it in bad condition?
 

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Look at the wear on it, miles play into it as well. Even if it looks good at a couple thousand miles I still change them. Not worth several hundred dollar repair because of a 5-10 dollar belt breaking. It is a standard V-Belt, they wear like any standard V-Belt does.
 
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