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New here. Picked up a '92 indy 500 EFI today. Looking forward to this forum along with getting back to snowmobiles after many decades.
65076


Has many rivets broken from the belly pan. Is thrre a good place to start removing the pan? Any stuff to avoid? Or guidence on removing the pan?
 

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Not to discourage you but that model wasn't the best with the EFI system it had. You will need a nearly new battery all the time to make it work. 1/2 dead won't cut it. Frozen battery won't cut it. It's a sensitive EFI system that's not the best design ever.

Steve
 

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if you look at the Polaris drawings of the parts, they may guide you in what you will need to do to remove what you want to remove...


Terminology is important, some people call the bulkhead the belly pan, some people call the skid shield the belly pan... it can be confusing. If it's the plastic that surrounds the bulkhead (the metal frame that holds the engine and drive train mounts) then it's very time consuming, but not horribly difficult. There are gobs of rivets to drill out, and the best way to get to some of them would be to pull the engine.. that way if you drill too deep you don't puncture something important.

If you take on this project, make sure to get good rivets. Stainless are awesome for this, as they won't rust out over time and have a lot of strength. You will quickly find it's advisable to purchase a pneumatic rivet puller. Harbor freight has a cheap version that works pretty good...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
if you look at the Polaris drawings of the parts, they may guide you in what you will need to do to remove what you want to remove...


Terminology is important, some people call the bulkhead the belly pan, some people call the skid shield the belly pan... it can be confusing. If it's the plastic that surrounds the bulkhead (the metal frame that holds the engine and drive train mounts) then it's very time consuming, but not horribly difficult. There are gobs of rivets to drill out, and the best way to get to some of them would be to pull the engine.. that way if you drill too deep you don't puncture something important.

If you take on this project, make sure to get good rivets. Stainless are awesome for this, as they won't rust out over time and have a lot of strength. You will quickly find it's advisable to purchase a pneumatic rivet puller. Harbor freight has a cheap version that works pretty good...
I have the pan off, now the tough part. Identifying correct rivets to repair the broken ones.

The rivets holding on the aluminum bracing. Is there anything specific to size and length to consider? This is where i am at now.
 

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What ever size you use, the rivet has to be able to extend completely through the material you are fastening so the head of the post can pull the rivet and mushroom it on the far side.

When I did a belly pan, I bought large head rivets in four different lengths (1/2", 5/8", 3/4", and 7/8".) Of those sizes, I have used the 1/2" and 5/8" the most. You can find 'em on Amazon or maybe Fastenal. If the price is too steep for the SS, there are also large head aluminum rivets that have a steel post. Those would probably work as well. You will want the air powered rivet gun, pulling the SS ones by hand will wear out your hands in a quick hurry. Harbor Freight has a pretty good gun for not much money.
 

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I buy my rivets in bulk from eBay or wherever has them cheaper. I buy 100-200 at a time of w/e size I need because no matter the quality you will always mess one up. I can do SS by hand even with a reconstructed right hand, what hurts is carpal tunnel areas over time as I still have never gotten the surgery done on both arms. I have a air riveter and iirc I got it from eBay because I didn't need it in time but if memory serves it ended up being the same one Harbor Freight sold just got it a bit cheaper is all.

Your best bet in that area is do what Dan said go SS with an air riveter if you have a that ability to use one and go from there. If you don't have an air compressor then you can the newer type of all aluminum rivets they make these days are really strong. There is different quality though so watch that. Go to Fastenal and get them from there, their prices are really good and tbh they have thousands of them in stock. If you are worried about price do this still go there buy a couple see how they work remember exactly what they are and go to amazon or eBay. Not like you ride this thing right now anyways unless you are in Alaska or Northern Canada!
 

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Ended up getting 3/16" steel sheer and tension rivets. Be here in a few days. I am considering adding extra around the top rim where all the aluminum gives strength as many are very loose and broken. Is this common or from abuse?
 

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The sled is over 28 years old it wouldn't be uncommon to have some broken. However from the sounds of it to me, it sounds like the guy was a heavy ditch banger and rode in all kinds of conditions which can destroy parts. So if it was me I would attribute to more along the line of abuse and not taking care of his toys. Preventative maintenance saves money in the long run. He should have been checking over the sled top to bottom before each season and looking for stuff like this. Sounds like he just didn't care enough to bother and is probably one of those people that just drives things into the ground until it breaks and then buys a new one.
 

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What KC? lol or do I dare even ask?

I have that same year EFI 500 and my is in damn good shape other then the front shocks being shot and me being too lazy to change them out since I never ride the damn thing and it just sits other then making sure everything is ok and starting it then fogging it all over again in the spring. None of my rivets are busted or look bad and I bought it as the 4th or 5th person who owned it.
 

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What KC? lol or do I dare even ask?

I have that same year EFI 500 and my is in damn good shape other then the front shocks being shot and me being too lazy to change them out since I never ride the damn thing and it just sits other then making sure everything is ok and starting it then fogging it all over again in the spring. None of my rivets are busted or look bad and I bought it as the 4th or 5th person who owned it.
I purchased mine last weekend, starts, runs fine (with a jump) when the hood was up, it just felt very flimsy. Upon detailed inspection at home, found like 8 rivets not attached. Could have just patched it up i guess, but a couple were up by the hinges, but under other pieces. This led to removing the belly and just replacing all of them. So far very easy task. Rivets should be here tomorrow. so weekend project.

Glad to hear you have the same one. Must be in great company here.
 

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Tbh I am not a fan of it. Most people switched them over to carbs because the EFI is so bad. Mine once I get one thing fixed something else breaks 2 weeks later so it is just a backup sled and tbh I am probably just going to part most of it out except the engine, the Xtra-10 rear suspension in it and a few other minor things. When they run they run great but many have had so many issues with that EFI they take a set of Mikuni 38mm carbs off another Indy 500 and rip all that stuff off and drill the hole for the line in the case and add a regular fuel pump and airbox and be done with it.

Make sure you replace that battery every season and also keep a tricker charger on it during the season to keep it charged up. That system has to have 12 volts or it just won't run right.

But I will say this..The Fuji Indy 500 is a one of the best to ever come out of Polaris snowmobiles. By far one of the most reliable engines with decent HP. So if the EFI system gives you issues look around for places to explain how to switch it over to carbs. I have a '97 Indy 500 with the same engine that is carbed and no difference other then clutching and plastic skis.
 
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