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Discussion Starter #1
2008 Articat m1000 sno pro 162 track EFI

So today I went and took out my sled. Running good for 15 mins and then boom, felt like someone pushed the kill switch. I try starting it again and it kinda idles then dies. I popped the hood, checked the plugs they looked good. Looked around for obvious stuff like broken wires and what not but nothing. I put it all back together and it idles for a bit and revs up once then dies again and won’t start. We towed it back down and a half hour later tried starting it again, it starts idles then dies then won’t start. Did that a few times. I then through in new plugs tonight and it ran for a bit and a bit better then died. Then I unplugged o2 sensor and the thing ran great, so as it was running I plugged the sensor in and out and noticed when sensor was plugged in it ran ok and tried to die then I’d unplugg it and it’d run great. Didn’t think an o2 sensor would do this. On a car never had something like this happen. Wondering what y’all think? Thanks in advance
 

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well a bad o2 sensor causes the computer to tell it the engine is going lean forcing more fuel causing unwanted conditions. The o2 sensor uses an open and closed loop system. during warm up it doesnt read the information this is the open loop. when it warms up and it gets the signal it takes the information and is in the "closed loop" where it then is used to control air and fuel delivery. So you could be experiencing a rich unchanging fuel mixture.

not speaking to your sled just how an o2 sensor works. In a car where your parameters for the air/fuel can handle a much richer condition. You typically experience bad gas mileage. in other systems when it impacts the air/fuel mixture this can create its own set of problems all around. Im going to guess new plugs worked out well up until they got soaked in fuel from a possibly default/safety mixture or just were more tolerant to the richer condition from a bad o2. But of course if its just faulty and bad who knows what it could be sending to the ECM and the condition it could cause in terms of how rich.
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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Any
Didn’t know I could do that. How do I do that?
NO o2 sensor on a Cat M1000, just a pipe temp sensor
Check your flashes on ECU and get what code
And why would It run different with that unplugged?
 

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Not sure if this is sequence but i saw it listed for an 07

Check Engine
(Crossfire/F-Series/
M-Series Models)
These diagnostic codes are flashed by the check engine
light incorporated within the speedometer/tachometer.
Refer to the following chart for diagnostic code
sequences.
NOTE: On single-digit codes (2, 4, etc.), the number
indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence. On double-digit codes (1-2, 1-6, etc.), the
first number indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence, there will be a short pause, and the second
number indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence.
If the coolant temperature is at or above 80° C (176°
F), the coolant temperature light will flash a warning
(alert). If the coolant temperature is at or above 93° C
(200° F), the coolant temperature light will cease flashing
and will remain constantly illuminated.
Number of Flashes Trouble
1-2
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in ignition coil.
1-6
(Check Engine Light)
Incorrect adjustment/failure in
APV cable.
1-7
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in exhaust temperature
sensor.
1-8
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in servomotor.
2
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in injector(s).
2-1
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in knock sensor.
2-3
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in knock control system.
4
(Check Engine Light)
Open or short circuit in barometric
pressure sensor.
5
(Check Engine Light)
Open or short circuit in intake air
temperature sensor.
6
(Check Engine Light)
Open or short circuit in water
temperature sensor.
7
(Check Engine Light)
Open or short circuit in throttle
position sensor.
Steady Flash
(Coolant Temperature Light)
Coolant Temperature Above 80°
C (176° F).
Constant On
(Coolant Temperature Light)
Coolant Temperature Above 93°
C (200° F



Diagnostic Codes/
Chassis Control Unit
(Crossfire/F-Series/
M-Series Models)
These diagnostic codes are flashed by the wrench icon
light incorporated within the speedometer/tachometer.
Refer to the following chart for diagnostic code
sequences.
NOTE: On these double-digit codes (3-1, 3-2, etc.),
the first number indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence, there will be a short pause, and
the second number indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence.
Number of Flashes Trouble
3-1
(CCU Icon)
Stator failure
(input open or shorted).
3-2
(CCU Icon)
High power DC output deactivated
(headlight/handwarmer).
3-3
(CCU Icon)
High power DC output shorted
(headlight/handwarmer).
3-4
(CCU Icon)
Low power DC output deactivated
(gauge/taillight/APV valves).
3-5
(CCU Icon)
Low power DC output shorted
(gauge/taillight/APV valves).
3-6
(CCU Icon)
System under voltage
(below 11 volts).
3-7
(CCU Icon)
System over voltage.
(above 15.5 volts).
3-8
(CCU Icon)
Gear shift actuator failure
(over current or over temperature).
4-2
(CCU Icon)
Tachometer input failure (engine running
- no tachometer
signal present).
4-3
(CCU Icon)
Gear position switch failure (did not
change - no (or invalid)
position input).
4-4
(CCU Icon)
CCU over temperature
(above 105° C - 221° F).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Not sure if this is sequence but i saw it listed for an 07

Check Engine
(Crossfire/F-Series/
M-Series Models)
These diagnostic codes are flashed by the check engine
light incorporated within the speedometer/tachometer.
Refer to the following chart for diagnostic code
sequences.
NOTE: On single-digit codes (2, 4, etc.), the number
indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence. On double-digit codes (1-2, 1-6, etc.), the
first number indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence, there will be a short pause, and the second
number indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence.
If the coolant temperature is at or above 80° C (176°
F), the coolant temperature light will flash a warning
(alert). If the coolant temperature is at or above 93° C
(200° F), the coolant temperature light will cease flashing
and will remain constantly illuminated.
Number of Flashes Trouble
1-2
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in ignition coil.
1-6
(Check Engine Light)
Incorrect adjustment/failure in
APV cable.
1-7
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in exhaust temperature
sensor.
1-8
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in servomotor.
2
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in injector(s).
2-1
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in knock sensor.
2-3
(Check Engine Light)
Failure in knock control system.
4
(Check Engine Light)
Open or short circuit in barometric
pressure sensor.
5
(Check Engine Light)
Open or short circuit in intake air
temperature sensor.
6
(Check Engine Light)
Open or short circuit in water
temperature sensor.
7
(Check Engine Light)
Open or short circuit in throttle
position sensor.
Steady Flash
(Coolant Temperature Light)
Coolant Temperature Above 80°
C (176° F).
Constant On
(Coolant Temperature Light)
Coolant Temperature Above 93°
C (200° F



Diagnostic Codes/
Chassis Control Unit
(Crossfire/F-Series/
M-Series Models)
These diagnostic codes are flashed by the wrench icon
light incorporated within the speedometer/tachometer.
Refer to the following chart for diagnostic code
sequences.
NOTE: On these double-digit codes (3-1, 3-2, etc.),
the first number indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence, there will be a short pause, and
the second number indicated will flash in an uninterrupted
sequence.
Number of Flashes Trouble
3-1
(CCU Icon)
Stator failure
(input open or shorted).
3-2
(CCU Icon)
High power DC output deactivated
(headlight/handwarmer).
3-3
(CCU Icon)
High power DC output shorted
(headlight/handwarmer).
3-4
(CCU Icon)
Low power DC output deactivated
(gauge/taillight/APV valves).
3-5
(CCU Icon)
Low power DC output shorted
(gauge/taillight/APV valves).
3-6
(CCU Icon)
System under voltage
(below 11 volts).
3-7
(CCU Icon)
System over voltage.
(above 15.5 volts).
3-8
(CCU Icon)
Gear shift actuator failure
(over current or over temperature).
4-2
(CCU Icon)
Tachometer input failure (engine running
- no tachometer
signal present).
4-3
(CCU Icon)
Gear position switch failure (did not
change - no (or invalid)
position input).
4-4
(CCU Icon)
CCU over temperature
(above 105° C - 221° F).
Currently it doesn’t want to start at all. Could that sensor prevent it starting
 

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Currently it doesn’t want to start at all. Could that sensor prevent it starting
I have no idea i know nothing about those sleds. I mean its not uncommon that some ECU's are programmed to not start if certain sensors are unplugged rather then bypassed. Its a failsafe/safety feature. id assume it used modern principles for the era and is completely possible. Ill do some more research and see if the answer has come up before.

Im pretty much speaking to the practical application in my answers and anything ive shared specifically i've found posted by others on the various forums to try and help.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I put a new sensor in, off of a 2011 duramax because they’re the same. It actually starts now and runs but it’s so cold here 15 degrees she still started harder then usual but I think she’s all good . Fingers crossed
 

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Thats some ingenuity right there and i like it. Hoping it works out well for you. Im sure the sensor probably has a value one could check to see if its bad. But i couldnt say. Im going to hope you got it ;)
 

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Cat didn't make the parts the assemble in Thief River Been there!
Find the ECU and there is a LED that will flash those codes
 
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