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Discussion Starter #1
I have been doing much maintenance and repair on the '92 Indy 500 SP as a distraction during this seasons "pandemic". At this point I have it all back together, (minus the seat - next week). Radius arm bushings along with a couple other steering bushings on order as there is slop all up there. When these arrive and I get them installed, my next hurdle is to get the track and steering adjusted and aligned properly.

Is the track tension related to steering alignment? In automotive service, alignment is based on the rear wheels to set the front.

As far as the steering, how is camber measured and set? I am aware it is with the radius arms, but when are they in the right spot. Sled on the ground, or front suspended?

Are there any special tools needed to measure and set camber? Toe?

I have been looking thru the PDF manuals and getting lost as it jumps from one style to another of suspension. I have also searched here, found some info but still missing something.
 

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Align the track first by making sure the rear suspension rails are centered in the track clips. I look at the track from the rear and see if the rails are equal in a track window.

For camber, you will need a 5/8" steel bar about 4' long. With the skis removed, the bar should be able to slip through both spindles. If the bar cannot go through, adjust the suspension until it can. If the bar goes through easily, camber and initial settings are fine. Measure the distance from the outside of one ski to the outside of the other one foot ahead and one foot behind the spindle. The measurements should be the same or at most, 1/8" toed out. (Front measurement 1/8" larger than rear). Any toe IN will make the sled dart and be difficult to control.

There's a whole section in the Clymer Polaris manual (1990-1995) on front suspension setup and includes pictures. but when I had pre-Edge Polaris sleds, using the bar to set camber and making sure i had no toe IN seemed to work pretty well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Align the track first by making sure the rear suspension rails are centered in the track clips. I look at the track from the rear and see if the rails are equal in a track window.

For camber, you will need a 5/8" steel bar about 4' long. With the skis removed, the bar should be able to slip through both spindles. If the bar cannot go through, adjust the suspension until it can. If the bar goes through easily, camber and initial settings are fine. Measure the distance from the outside of one ski to the outside of the other one foot ahead and one foot behind the spindle. The measurements should be the same or at most, 1/8" toed out. (Front measurement 1/8" larger than rear). Any toe IN will make the sled dart and be difficult to control.

There's a whole section in the Clymer Polaris manual (1990-1995) on front suspension setup and includes pictures. but when I had pre-Edge Polaris sleds, using the bar to set camber and making sure i had no toe IN seemed to work pretty well.
Awesome. Thanks. Also tension on the track?
 

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The book answer is to lift the rear of the sled to get the suspension off the ground, then hang a 10 lb weight from the center of the track 16" in front of the rear idler wheels. Measure the distance from a track clip to the hi-fax material on the rails. The distance should be between 3/8" and 1/2". To change the distance, loosen the lock nuts on the adjusting bolts (one on each side) and adjust equally until you get the correct dimension. If I do it this way, I use a 10 lb weight inside the suspension on the upper surface of the lower part of the track. It's easier than trying to hang something from the track. Just remember to remove the weight when you are done!!

I like to run my track a little looser than that, so I will adjust it and if the track ratchets under load, I will tighten it up until it quits ratcheting. You will feel the track ratcheting as the drivers on the driveline attempt to engage the drive lugs on the track, but slip over them. Too tight gives you too much resistance, poor performance, poor fuel mileage, and can damage the track and/or drivers. Too loose, you get ratcheting, which can also damage the track/drivers.
 

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Josh Kidner has posted the 1985-1995 Polaris Shop Manual at the top of this section in the Stickies. Adjusting the camber is done on front with suspension hanging and spindle bushing removed so the rod can go through spindles. Once it slides through easily as BC stated the camber is set and the skis are straight ahead. Then adjust linkage between steering shaft and the steering arm ctr to get handle bars straight. Toe out spec is 1/8" to 1/4" but I've had good luck running at 0.
 

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Just to add... when I first wanted to make sure my camber was set, I went to a steel supply place to get the 5/8" bar. The cost was less than 5 bucks for the four feet needed.

For those that have newer sleds, the Polaris repair manuals list the procedures using a similar bar and with different points of measurement. It's a good thing to do after you change any components or to check for problems that could lead to poor performance and darting.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just to add... when I first wanted to make sure my camber was set, I went to a steel supply place to get the 5/8" bar. The cost was less than 5 bucks for the four feet needed.

For those that have newer sleds, the Polaris repair manuals list the procedures using a similar bar and with different points of measurement. It's a good thing to do after you change any components or to check for problems that could lead to poor performance and darting.
When you checked yours, was it off?
 

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On every sled i've had i check it. It's always off. Same as a front end alignment on a car. Do it one day perfect and drive down the road and it's off the next. Just gotta get it set as good as possible. I can always tell on a sled when it's right. Tracking, steering, handling all are affected by it.

Steve
 

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My camber was off a couple of degrees, I could not slide the bar through both spindles. Toe was pretty spot on, but the sled had Simmons skis and the previous owner had probably set the toe to 0 for those. I did notice a bit easier steering on that sled, but it was pretty good before. On a previous sled, it was off a lot. That sled had been through the ringer and needed a lot of parts to get it tight. Sloppy heim joints and worn bushings are as bad as bad camber/toe settings.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My camber was off a couple of degrees, I could not slide the bar through both spindles. Toe was pretty spot on, but the sled had Simmons skis and the previous owner had probably set the toe to 0 for those. I did notice a bit easier steering on that sled, but it was pretty good before. On a previous sled, it was off a lot. That sled had been through the ringer and needed a lot of parts to get it tight. Sloppy heim joints and worn bushings are as bad as bad camber/toe settings.
Some of my new bushings arrived yesterday, radius rod bushings are not here until monday. Once all that gets snug, i will move on to phase two - and see what else is worn out. Glad i started this in spring, 28 year old sled needs alot of repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Success today. I put it he 10lbs weight in the track area, adjusted the gap to 1/2". No problems on both sides. New bolts used, with plenty of "anti sieze" for next time.

The front end proved more difficult. Ok ne ski would not come off due to the ski bolt siezed in the bushing, ugh... the other ski came off, but the bushing was frozen in the steering knuckle. Took a torch a bit. Followed by an air hammer then success. I removed the tie rod ends, installed radius srm bushings, sent that 5/8" rod thru smooth like silk. No adjustment to my suprise. Setvthe handle bars straight, one rie rod slipped right back on. No issues, the other one was off a few turns. All connected, tight and the bar goes thru.

Now awaiting ski bushing and bolt kit, along with new carbides for the skies.

In all, close to getting this sled ready for the season. Thanks to everyone here.

A few pictures just for fun.
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