Snowmobile Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I had this thing going just fine last spring after I replaced a half-toothless sprocket in the drive chain. But this winter, I started it up and it sounded ok, but it doesn't want to go anywhere with anyone on it. I can lift up the track, and it'll spin when I push the throttle, but it just doesn't have enough power to go anywhere. Any ideas? Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
153 Posts
when you replaced the sprocket how did the tensioners look, I would start by pulling the chaincase cover off and starting up see exactly whats going on, but if your old sprocket was toothless my guess is tension was not working and the chain was slipping before and still is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,131 Posts
And or a piece of the old sprocket is caught in the new chain!
Could also just be the clutches are dirty and belt is worn! Sand down the sheves and blow them out real good and put a new belt on. Also check your center to centers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
when you replaced the sprocket how did the tensioners look, I would start by pulling the chaincase cover off and starting up see exactly whats going on, but if your old sprocket was toothless my guess is tension was not working and the chain was slipping before and still is.
nah, I know exactly what a slipping chain sounds like after it doing it so much. I can hear the engine working to move the weight and sounding like it would if the track was frozen to the ground. It's not the sound of an engine revving with no gear in place. The tension was very tight when I stuck things back together.


And or a piece of the old sprocket is caught in the new chain!
Could also just be the clutches are dirty and belt is worn! Sand down the sheves and blow them out real good and put a new belt on. Also check your center to centers!

I think the belt is practically new (or was when I bought it used 14 years ago, and has hardly been used since). I'll check to see if any bits are caught in there. What are sheves? Sorry, mechanics is not my thing, accept when I'm forced at gun point to fix something.


"Center to centers." Are you talking track alignment?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,338 Posts
Sheaves are the part of the primary and secondary that the belt touches. On each clutch, one is movable, one is stationary. If you have a black ring around the drive clutch, it's probably belt residue and your clutch can't do a good job of gripping the belt in that area, so it slips.

Center to center refers to the distance between the clutches. You may also have too much belt deflection. The belt should be riding about 1/8" out of the secondary clutch when you stop.

I would also check the normal things; if you have a fouled plug, there won't be enough HP to move the sled. A bad plug wire or plug connector can do the same thing. Carbs that need cleaning can cause a bog, will the sled move if you apply the choke lever briefly as you try to accelerate? If so, that would indicate that the pilot jet circuit in the carb needs to be cleaned. The belt may be lightly used, but may have deteriorated over time. Remove it and scrub the sides with a stiff brush, and also bend it backwards slightly along it's full length to see if you have excessive cracking.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top