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Discussion Starter #1
Looking to buy an 02 Edge X 800 as part of a package deal. Sled has 10k miles and need to know the reliability. Has been serviced/maintenance every year and always stored inside. What do I need to be wary of? My current is a 97 xcr 600.
 

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The 800 had lots of power but lots of problems. The problems were most common on the long tracked sleds. The biggest issue was the crankcase. The crankcase was too porous and the torque of the engine would elongate the crank journals to the point that the crank would fail. Sometimes the crank would break at the PTO end, leaving the primary clutch stationary as the engine ran, other times the clutch would break off and fall into the belly pan. Neither give you a good feeling if you are a ways from the trailer.

Most of the mountain sleds got a wider bearing installed on the PTO end of the crankshaft, replacing one of the two bearings. That helps spread out the force of the crankshaft across a larger area and helps dissipate the force into the crank with less damage. Other things you can do- balance the clutch (Polaris clutches are notorious for being out of balance), add an engine plate, torque stop and engine stop to the front of the engine to keep the engine planted.

Another failure point is the VES valves on the engine. The original engine (2002) had aluminum valves. The 800 cylinders do not have any cooling around the valves, so with hard use, the cylinders can get hot enough to melt the valves and drop them on top of the piston. That ruins your day. A titanium fix was available for 2003 and by 2004 the valves were made of stainless steel. If your valves are smooth on both sides, they are aluminum. The SS valves have a cavity on one side to reduce weight so the SS valves would react against the VES spring the same as the aluminum ones.

It's pretty remarkable that the sled you are looking at has made 10k. It must have been one of the good ones!

Good luck, but buyer beware!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The 800 had lots of power but lots of problems. The problems were most common on the long tracked sleds. The biggest issue was the crankcase. The crankcase was too porous and tphe torque of the engine would elongate the crank journals to the point that the crank would fail. Sometimes the crank would break at the PTO end, leaving the primary clutch stationary as the engine ran, other times the clutch would break off and fall into the belly pan. Neither give you a good feeling if you are a ways from the trailer.

Most of the mountain sleds got a wider bearing installed on the PTO end of the crankshaft, replacing one of the two bearings. That helps spread out the force of the crankshaft across a larger area and helps dissipate the force into the crank with less damage. Other things you can do- balance the clutch (Polaris clutches are notorious for being out of balance), add an engine plate, torque stop and engine stop to the front of the engine to keep the engine planted.

Another failure point is the VES valves on the engine. The original engine (2002) had aluminum valves. The 800 cylinders do not have any cooling around the valves, so with hard use, the cylinders can get hot enough to melt the valves and drop them on top of the piston. That ruins your day. A titanium fix was available for 2003 and by 2004 the valves were made of stainless steel. If your valves are smooth on both sides, they are aluminum. The SS valves have a cavity on one side to reduce weight so the SS valves would react against the VES spring the same as the aluminum ones.

It's pretty remarkable that the sled you are looking at has made 10k. It must have been one of the good ones!

Good luck, but buyer beware!!
[/QU
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info and confirming a few articles I read after I posted this. Seems like all the ones that have the issues are the long tracks and "upgrades". I like to keep these things stock. For example I have a 97 xcr 600 that still absolutely screams down the trails with well over 10k miles (speedo stopped at 9600 miles) and is bone stock except for the belt. This is a trail sled from Wisconsin and not beat on as far as I can see. Itz being sold with a 03 xc 600 with 8k and a n enclosed trailer bith in very nice condition. And yes buyer beware!
 
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