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2 questions sledders. First, 1986 Arctic Cat Pantera 440. Main wiring plug is installed on only 2 of 4 prongs. Wired for electric start, ignition switch has been pulled out, runs 1/4 throttle and up AWESOME. Refuses to idle, and has no lights or kill. Must choke to shut down. How to fix? (Guessing clean carbs, but what about the wiring?) Second, 1996 Ski-Doo Touring, used to be one of my uncle's machines(owns a touring business in North Lake Tahoe). One big plug near the headlight is unplugged. Runs great, but no light, no flywheel, so no electric start. Is there any advantage to electric start? Besides being a lazy a*%?. Would like to get it all working as original though. Second problem. I got this machine for free. Looks like it lost a bearing on the driveshaft, and the shaft came loose. I have been told to pull the case cover and extract the shaft that way to replace the bearings. Sounds reasonable, but is there anything special I need to know? Also, how do you loosen the track. This thing has a 380. How fast will it go. I am fairly new to this, only 2-3 years experience and don't see any need to go 70+, but I would like to know if this machine is capable of 60. That is about my limit. Thanks.
 

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I am Spartacus
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SOunds like both machines need a new key switch installed. The Cat needs the carbs cleaned because the pilot jets are blocked, not letting idle fuel fet through. The key switch should solve your other problems. Make sure you buy a switch for electric start models. The SkiDoo needs to have the chaincase cover removed so you can remove the drive shaft. It's not a bad job to do that part, but replacing the shaft bearing can be a chore. Try a key switch for that sled too.
 

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We just had to replace one of the bearings on my dad's '86 Tundra. It must have been shot for quite some time because the spot on the shaft where the bearing is is supposed to be 1" in diameter, but it was down to 3/4". The only major difficulties were taking off / putting on the suspension springs, and actually changing the bearing, the bearing is pretty tight on the shaft and has to be lined up just right. Other than that, is wasn't much of a deal. And to loosen the track there is a bolt on either side at the back of the track by the rear bogeys, loosen/tighten them, and it will loosen/tighten the track.
 

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When loosening track, back the tensioners *way* off, then smack the track (don't do damage) with a mallet or 2x4 to get it to slide in. Just loosening the tension screws will only move the wheels in as far as the tension on the track will pull them. If your wheels are tight (like mine were) that's not far enough to make the job go easy. You need to move them in as far as possible, or it will give you HELL putting it back together.

...I speak from experience... :rolleyes:
 
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