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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All. I live in Cape Dorset, Nunavut. I recently bought two used 2003 Polaris 340 Indy touring sleds. I have been going through both machines trying to get them up to snuff and have run into a problem with mine. I put a new Polaris belt on the machine and in less than half a tank of fuel, it has torn the side out of the belt and is fraying the cords: trash now. The machine has about 7000 km's on it and I doubt the secondary clutch has been fully rebuilt. When I looked at the belt is sitting too high on the secondary clutch. I think the deflection is off and it is too tight, forcing the belt up. When the belt was new, the machine would move when idling. So, I think I know what the problem is, but I am not sure. It seems a pretty drastic problem that was not happening prior to the other work done on the machine. The only work that has been done to the engine/chaincase is an inspection by popping off the chaincase cover. However we have taken the skid off numerous times. However, I can't see how that would effect the clutches.

My big problem up here is that the only garage in town has now decided to become Yamaha specific. I do not feel I have the expertise or tools to get into a major project and a bit uncomfortable opening Pandora's box. I am wondering if it could be something other than worn out parts inside the secondary clutch? If that is the case though, I am thinking about just picking up a secondary clutch rebuild kit ($70.00) from Royal Distributing in Ontario.

So, my questions are:

1. What do you think is causing the problem?
2. How do I fix it (please be super specific if you can)? What special tools do I need and can I make them?

Thank you all for your help as I am in a tight spot since I use my snowmobile everyday to take my daughter to school and I use it to get to work.

-Richard
 

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On the outside of the secondary there should be a gold colored adjuster. To adjust the deflection, you loosen the three small bolts that hold the adjuster and turn it to either open or close the sheaves. You want the belt to be riding outside of the clutch about 1/8".

To adjust the offset, take a straight edge that is long enough to go from the back of the primary across the back of the secondary. Place the straight edge across the back of the primary. Measure the distance from the straight edge to the back of the secondary. That distance will be 5/8" for clutches without a starter ring gear, 1" for those with a starter gear. To change the offset, you will need to add or remove shims from the back of the secondary and remove or add the same amount of shims from the bolt that holds the secondary. With the offset set correctly, there should be a small amount of looseness (float) on the secondary to prevent side-loading of the jackshaft bearing and to help keep the clutches in alignment.

Try both these things first, they are cheap things to fix. If the problem continues, then it's time to dig into the clutch itself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
p85 or p90?

Thanks BC Dan, but isn't that for a p-85 secondary? I think I have a P-90. I looked at the service manual and it seemed much more complicated. However, I think I am going to pull it off tomorrow and see what's what. Thanks for the help, I'll let you know how it goes.
 
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