Thinking of getting a couple Polaris XC sleds. - Snowmobile Forum: Your #1 Snowmobile Forum
User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-02-2019, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thinking of getting a couple Polaris XC sleds.

Hey guys and gals, this is my first post here.

I'm thinking about getting my son and I snowmobiles for next season. I'm think about getting a XC500 or 600 for him and a XC700 or 800 for me. We'll probably get early 2000's models.

He'll be 18 next season. He has his drivers license, been riding ATV's and dirt bikes his whole life. Not much time on a sled though. Is there much of a performance difference between the XC500 and 600? Is one more reliable then the other?

I've always liked the XC700. Been seeing some XC800's lately. As with the XC500/600, is there much of a performance difference between the XC700 and 800? Is one more reliable then the other? Also what's the difference between the XC700 and 700 Classic?

No matter which sleds we get, they're going to be stock, other then replacement parts ect.

We'll do mainly trail riding in the Tug Hill region of NY with some lake riding every once in a while.

Thanks, NYH1.
NYH1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 01:39 AM
Registered User
 
FaceDeAce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Get two 700 or 800. For the following reasons.
- if you get him a 500/600 ... that is the one that YOU will be riding
- interchange of parts and common spare parts. One set of parts serves the needs of both machines.
FaceDeAce is offline  
post #3 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 02:10 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FaceDeAce View Post
Get two 700 or 800. For the following reasons.
- if you get him a 500/600 ... that is the one that YOU will be riding
- interchange of parts and common spare parts. One set of parts serves the needs of both machines.
I'm not sure I want him to have a 700/800 size sled as a first sled. I'd really have to think about that. He's only ridden a few times. That was just around the house.

NYH1.
NYH1 is offline  
 
post #4 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 08:04 AM
Registered User
 
wildthangci's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: N. Wisconsin
Posts: 233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
The 600 liberty is one of the most dependable motors ever put in a snowmobile. I would go with either both 600s or a 600 and a 700. The early 800 twins from all manufacturers were more prone to issues. JMHO.
wildthangci is offline  
post #5 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 12:41 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildthangci View Post
The 600 liberty is one of the most dependable motors ever put in a snowmobile. I would go with either both 600s or a 600 and a 700. The early 800 twins from all manufacturers were more prone to issues. JMHO.
wildthangci, thanks.

We probably will get a 600 and a 700. I've been seeing a few more 800's around and was asking about them incase I come across a good deal on one.

NYH1.
NYH1 is offline  
post #6 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 01:03 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 985
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
I agree get a pair of the 600VES and you will be set!

When he out grows that let him get his own!
LOL
KCCats2 is offline  
post #7 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 01:24 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What's the main difference between the XC600/700 and the 600/700 Classic?

Thanks, NYH1.
NYH1 is offline  
post #8 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 05:58 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: In Marinette County, Wi
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
600/700 Classic is nice because it comes with electric start and a bunch of upgrades that the regular XC doesn't unless they added that option at the dealership. I have been wanting a 600 classic for awhile but they don't come up often in my area and when they do they go fast for a reason. The suspensions are top notch, the 600 engine is top notch with tons of clutching options, plus you can upgrade the reeds just stay away from doing pipes which is imho due to DNR and other issues. But there are others who will disagree with that.
Coolhand is offline  
post #9 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 07:09 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coolhand View Post
600/700 Classic is nice because it comes with electric start and a bunch of upgrades that the regular XC doesn't unless they added that option at the dealership. I have been wanting a 600 classic for awhile but they don't come up often in my area and when they do they go fast for a reason. The suspensions are top notch, the 600 engine is top notch with tons of clutching options, plus you can upgrade the reeds just stay away from doing pipes which is imho due to DNR and other issues. But there are others who will disagree with that.
Coolhand, thanks for the info.

I've been seeing both 600/700 Classic's for sale in my area, there's more 700's though. Is the ride a little more plush on the Classic models then on the XC models?

Thanks again, NYH1.
NYH1 is offline  
post #10 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 07:22 PM
Registered User
 
wildthangci's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: N. Wisconsin
Posts: 233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
The XC series is set up for more aggressive riders while the classic is set up more for trail comfort. The differences are subtle, mostly shock valving and spring rates.

Live Long and Prosper
wildthangci is offline  
post #11 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildthangci View Post
The XC series is set up for more aggressive riders while the classic is set up more for trail comfort. The differences are subtle, mostly shock valving and spring rates.

Live Long and Prosper
Maybe I should look into a Classic model for myself. A little smoother ride wouldn't hurt, having a bad back and all.

Thanks, NYH1.
NYH1 is offline  
post #12 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 08:08 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: North Ontario
Posts: 83
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Instead of looking for specific make / models, recommend looking at features as well.

For example:

- Electric start. To me, this is a must. Especially at my older age.
- Reverse. To me, this is a must. Especially at my older age.
- For bad backs (like mine), have a serious look at 2-up design. On my 2-up design, I simply move its rear back rest forward and use it as a great back rest for a single driver. For me, I'll never own a single seat sled for myself again.
- Seriously think of different "models" for your driving conditions. If mostly doing trails, then get a trail suspension machine. On my local trails, some folks like the longer tracks better - due to smoother ride.
- Is power steering critical to you? My one older age buddy loves Power Steering feature so much, he'll never buy another sled without it. Especially since his wife likes driving his sled as well. After test driving his sled, I agree. Power Steering is a "must have" on my future sled replacement as well.
- Look at windshield height design. My wife loves the high and flat windshield designs. She doesn't like wind blowing against her upper chest and face area. She often tucks her upper body behind my sled's "old style" shape windshield. Other folks don't mind a lower profile body style and always having their body in the wind. For me, I love sitting on the seat and my line of sight is slightly over the windshield.
- Hand and Thumb warmers are a must. If buying used, make sure their dimmer dial works properly. To me, minimum hand warmers are a must.
- New or used (or upgrade after buying), get a sled that has electric plug for heated helmet shield. My modular "flip up" helmet has heated shield and it never fogs up. And, one can flip it up and normally talk during rest spots on the trail as well. To me, 12 volt power plug for helmet heat shields are mandatory.
- Dual side mirrors are a must as well. Especially for trail riding.
- Do you really need large size engines? I've got a 600 and on the trails, it has no problems keeping up with the larger size engines. Especially with the many ground speed restrictions and tight corners of my local trails. The larger size engines are sometimes harder to hang onto. Especially around the tight corners.
- Go with 4-stroke if you don't like the smell of burnt fumes. No worries for some folks but for others, they cannot stand the smell of burt 2-stoke oil. Hanging their rider clothes outside to air out after each ride isn't enjoyable either. If wondering, I always need full shower and change of clothes after long trail rides. Even I can smell myself after each ride.
- If long distance riding, go with 4-strokes. 4-strokes have extremely much better mileage. Especially if your local trails don't have available fuel stations.
- Before buying, call your insurance company and ask for quote - for different models. For my 1999 600 Yamaha Venture 600, I pay $69 year. Mostly because its a small size engine and its a 20 year old sled. And, being a "classic" year, yearly OFSC trail passes are a lot less expensive as well. Majorly saved dollars in these areas easily pays for more fuel - for my gas hog 2-stroke. Thus, keeping yearly usage costs at a minimum. If wondering, my 600 2-stroke goes 200 kms (125 miles) per full tank of gas. Or, nice 5 hour trail ride.

Long mumblings short.... It isn't about largest engine size or specific models. Or, if a specific sled "looks cool". It's about features, keeping yearly running costs low, rider comfort and "having fun" - regardless of one's sled age. Especially if one has a bad back (like my older age body)....

Last edited by Jack99; 02-03-2019 at 08:41 PM.
Jack99 is offline  
post #13 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 08:55 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack99 View Post
Instead of looking for specific make / models, recommend looking at features as well.

For example:

- Electric start. To me, this is a must. Especially at my older age.
- Reverse. To me, this is a must. Especially at my older age.
- For bad backs (like mine), have a serious look at 2-up design. On my 2-up design, I simply move its rear back rest forward and use it as a great back rest for a single driver. For me, I'll never own a single seat sled for myself again.
- Seriously think of different "models" for your driving conditions. If mostly doing trails, then get a trail suspension machine. On my local trails, some folks like the longer tracks better - due to smoother ride.
- Is power steering critical to you? My one older age buddy loves Power Steering feature so much, he'll never buy another sled without it. Especially since his wife likes driving his sled as well. After test driving his sled, I agree. Power Steering is a "must have" on my future sled replacement as well.
- Look at windshield height design. My wife loves the high and flat windshield designs. She doesn't like wind blowing against her upper chest and face area. She often tucks her upper body behind my sled's "old style" shape windshield. Other folks don't mind a lower profile body style and always having their body in the wind. For me, I love sitting on the seat and my line of sight is slightly over the windshield.
- Hand and Thumb warmers are a must. If buying used, make sure their dimmer dial works properly. To me, minimum hand warmers are a must.
- New or used (or upgrade after buying), get a sled that has electric plug for heated helmet shield. My modular "flip up" helmet has heated shield and it never fogs up. And, one can flip it up and normally talk during rest spots on the trail as well. To me, 12 volt power plug for helmet heat shields are mandatory.
- Dual side mirrors are a must as well. Especially for trail riding.
- Do you really need large size engines? I've got a 600 and on the trails, it has no problems keeping up with the larger size engines. Especially with the many ground speed restrictions and tight corners of my local trails. The larger size engines are sometimes harder to hang onto. Especially around the tight corners.
- Go with 4-stroke if you don't like the smell of burnt fumes. No worries for some folks but for others, they cannot stand the smell of burt 2-stoke oil. Hanging their rider clothes outside to air out after each ride isn't enjoyable either. If wondering, I always need full shower and change of clothes after long trail rides. Even I can smell myself after each ride.
- If long distance riding, go with 4-strokes. 4-strokes have extremely much better mileage. Especially if your local trails don't have available fuel stations.
- Before buying, call your insurance company and ask for quote - for different models. For my 1999 600 Yamaha Venture 600, I pay $69 year. Mostly because its a small size engine and its a 20 year old sled. And, being a "classic" year, yearly OFSC trail passes are a lot less expensive as well. Majorly saved dollars in these areas easily pays for more fuel - for my gas hog 2-stroke. Thus, keeping yearly usage costs at a minimum. If wondering, my 600 2-stroke goes 200 kms (125 miles) per full tank of gas. Or, nice 5 hour trail ride.

Long mumblings short.... It isn't about largest engine size or specific models. Or, if a specific sled "looks cool". It's about features, keeping yearly running costs low, rider comfort and "having fun" - regardless of one's sled age. Especially if one has a bad back (like my older age body)....
Thanks!

NYH1.
NYH1 is offline  
post #14 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-03-2019, 10:18 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: In Marinette County, Wi
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Those Classics and the XC turn about as easy as anything else out there. I have never owned a sled with power steering and probably never will. With Plastic Skis they turn easy at least they do to me and that is on late '90s Polaris Evolved sleds.

And for those Classic I wouldn't worry too much about 2 stroke smell or usage. You HAVE to use Full Synthetic on those or the valves will gum up badly and quickly. I run Full Synthetic on mine and the oil usage is nowhere near what it was on Polaris Blue before they went semi-blend on it.

Hand and thumb warmers are standard since the mid '90s unless you are buying a low end 340,550 or something like that.

A 12v Power plug isn't necessary either. While I have some fogging issues with my full modular HJC and would like to stop it, as long as I open up the shield a tiny crack it goes away. Plus you can always add that option down the line if you really want to.

As far as what he says about Trail passes, idk where you live but in most states they are not going to give a break on your 2 year or yearly registration fees because of its age. Wisconsin SURE as hell doesn't! Not too mention we have an ADDED YEARLY Trail Pass we have to buy for EACH SLED! Which I find to be absolute BS and I have a few reasons why. But that is my main complaint about Wisconsin and the DNR and their crookedness.

As far as MPG I get 10-11 miles a gallon out of ours and we have 11.7 gallon tank size. If I am near a gas station and I or anyone else is at half a tank we stop and fill up. Why take chances out in the middle of nowhere? Besides stopping every couple of hours depending on your group isn't a bad thing as some need that break.

Also don't forget to check the oil every gas stop and ALWAYS carry a extra Quart of Oil in your sled, if it is you and your son then split the stuff up between the 2 sleds. One sled carry tools, extra fuel line, a fuel filter, I carry an extra fuel pump since mine are 16 bucks, I carry TONS of tools and I carry a Quart of Coolant. In my other sled I have a extra Quart of AMSOIL, a sled tow rope you can buy lots of places, maps of all the counties in my area or w/e area we are going along with extra gloves in BOTH sleds as well and w/e else we can stuff in there. By the time we are done both our sleds are packed pretty tight in the trunk box full of everything we need. And then under the hood in the Polaris tool holder we carry 2-3 extra sets of plugs in each sled, 2 new NGK Spark Plug Caps, our registration info & I think that is it. But I know in a case of emergency I am getting home. Those caps, and that extra fuel pump has saved us out in the middle of the northwoods of wisconsin over 100 miles away from home at 3 in the afternoon!

Jack makes good info on all of his post. But I wanted to show a little difference on a couple points as I have a bad back that is bad enough I am going tomorrow to schedule the lower back surgery on it for sometime in the spring with a 1 inch protrusion sticking out on to my nerve. And I ride a '97 Indy 500 with a single up seat and it don't bother me and I don't wear a back brace. I'm 42 with many surgeries including 26 between both knees.

What I am getting at in the above paragraph is...Ride the way you want..take your time..I don't ride full out, I sit on the sled and go, I don't get stupid and jump stuff but I know what my body can take with regards to bumpy areas, just take your time and don't go flying over them like some people tend to do. That is how you ruin your sled and your body!

Good luck with all of it and whatever you buy just make sure your investigate it and ask questions, DO NOT be afraid to take them out for a test ride, bring along a compression gauge, do what YOU need to feel safe with YOUR and YOUR sons purchase!
Coolhand is offline  
post #15 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 06:50 AM
Registered User
 
wildthangci's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: N. Wisconsin
Posts: 233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
X2 to that Coolhand. At 49 with a real bad back (off to the Chiropractor again today), ride is a concern for me as well. I've spent lots of hours on a 2001 XC SP 600 in the past few years and couldn't be happier with the ride. Sure the newer stuff is smoother, but alot more expensive and colder as well.
wildthangci is offline  
post #16 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 02:39 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: North Ontario
Posts: 83
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Coolhand. Age 42. Wow. You are young. My oldest age son is around your age. At my much older age, Power Steering becomes as must. Especially when my wife drives the sled as well. Based on your feedback, I'll use up my existing Castrol 2T oil and switch to Amsoil Synthetic Oil Injection blend. Hopefully, it won't stink as much. And best of all, I was told this Amsoil blend can be used in my other summer time 2-stroke engines as well.

I enjoyed your comments about "going the ground speed one wants....". During last weekend, I went on a long 5 hour drive with a 71 year old (he was on a 2002 Yamaha 700 short track sled). Bet our max speed on the straight open trail was 45 kms per hour (27 mph) with our normal lower speed in 25 kms per hour (15 mph) range. I really enjoyed riding with him. Especially at our slower ground speeds.
Jack99 is offline  
post #17 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-04-2019, 04:47 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: In Marinette County, Wi
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
My dad is 72 and still rides like he is in his 30s-40s. He still rides a late '90s sled with plastic skis and throws that sled around better then I can! lol.

As far as my surgeries go if I were to list them it would take up half the page of the existing posts! I've almost died several times as well since Nov 2010 to the point I had less then 5% chance of living when I was brought in, I won't go into details on a public forum. But I should have been dead several times in my life and somehow I am still alive and kicking.

Yeah I LOVE AMSOIL Full Synthetic Interceptor oil. I can buy it for 8.99 a quart on sale all the time during the summer and fall, and I can get a gallon for 38.99 on sale during the winter as then the price jumps a couple bucks to 9.99 or 10.99 a quart and even then I would still pay that but right now I have a full gallon and 3.5 quarts sitting not counting the 1 quart in the sled. Yes you can use that stuff year round, that is what we do. I have a Ratio-Rite with all the mix stuff built right in on it. I'm sure most people here know what those are and it works great for that kind of stuff. Canadian eBay link for ya. I just bought it from this guy as mine after 35 years of use was destroyed and barely readable.

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Ratio-Rite-P...h/401239500432

US link for it I got mine very quickly in 2 days from Cali

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ratio-Rite-...h/401239500432
Coolhand is offline  
post #18 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-05-2019, 12:28 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have to ask this because they are pretty popular in my area as well.

Do the XLT triples ride a lot rougher in trails then the XC/Classic sleds? I've never own a triple. I think the last one I rode was a '89 Indy 650.

Thanks, NYH1.
NYH1 is offline  
post #19 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-05-2019, 02:10 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: In Marinette County, Wi
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Yes the ride will not be as good as the Classic or XC sleds. The Classics are the one you want to go for imho. I know some will disagree on this board but some of those XLT engines had issues blowing up. By the time they finally fixed all of the issues the XLT run was coming to an end in '98/'99.

Go with the Classic then the XC as the options with the Classic are second to none!
Coolhand is offline  
post #20 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-05-2019, 03:16 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Central New York
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coolhand View Post
Yes the ride will not be as good as the Classic or XC sleds. The Classics are the one you want to go for imho. I know some will disagree on this board but some of those XLT engines had issues blowing up. By the time they finally fixed all of the issues the XLT run was coming to an end in '98/'99.

Go with the Classic then the XC as the options with the Classic are second to none!
Cool, thanks.

NYH1.

Last edited by NYH1; 02-05-2019 at 03:34 PM.
NYH1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Snowmobile Forum: Your #1 Snowmobile Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome