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Old 12-24-2007, 01:27 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Question How to replace Rotax 299 crank seals...

I'm doing some work on my 299 one-lunger. I'm having the cylinder honed, and it's been suggested that I replace the crank seals as long as I've got it apart.

First, what's the easiest way to pull the clutch?

Second, can I take the seals out and replace them without splitting the case?

Third, are there any pitfalls I should know about?
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Old 12-24-2007, 03:35 PM   #2 (permalink)
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You need the puller made for that engine to pull the clutch.
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Old 12-24-2007, 04:03 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Pulling the clutch is easy, its in 2 pieces, remove the bolt and the outer part comes off, then unscrew the inner part from the crank. The hardest part if you've already pulled the jug will be keeping the crank from turning without damaging it.
Some folks will tell you you can't replace the crank seals without splitting the case. However I've had reasonably good luck heating the seal up and gently slipping it into place with a dull screwdriver. Patience is the key on this one...
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Old 12-24-2007, 04:04 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Whoops, SEG beat me but if you've got the stock clutch on the 299 he's wrong. They're not at all like modern clutches. Very primative by comparison.
One last thing, when you put it back together put some graphite on the pivots on the weights in the clutch. It stinks to get one back together and have the weights bind. You may find a little rust or crud in those pivot points, just clean 'em up. I hate to use grease on them as any crud in the grease would make 'em bind up. Graphite is a pretty good compromise. I don't think they were lubricated at all when they were new. At least the ones I've taken apart didn't have any lubrication...
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Old 12-25-2007, 08:07 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Exclamation Clutch puller

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Originally Posted by curtludwig
Pulling the clutch is easy, its in 2 pieces, remove the bolt and the outer part comes off, then unscrew the inner part from the crank. The hardest part if you've already pulled the jug will be keeping the crank from turning without damaging it....
A buddy of mine told me that the older singles just use a bolt to pull the clutch. The bolt is only threaded at the top end by the head, and the other end of the shaft is bare so that it bottoms out on the end of the crankshaft. He said I could even have one made if I found a bolt long enough. When I get the cylinder back from honing, I'll just slip it back on and stuff it with old socks. That's what I did to pull the magneto.

I know what you mean about the dogs in the clutch. I used to use white lithium grease to keep them lubricated. Only problem is that it flies everywhere when the clutch opens. The clutch cover is missing.

Thanks for the help, and Merry Christmas!
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Old 12-25-2007, 01:31 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I think your buddy is wrong but the more we talk about this the more doubts I have...
I *think* the way I did it was to put some rope down the sparkplug hole and just turn the inner half of the clutch backwards and it unthreaded itself from the crank. This I'm reasonably sure the inner half of the clutch is independantly threaded onto the crank thus no removal tool is needed. You might need a big strap wrench to make the inner half turn. I think I was able to just grab it with both hands and turn it though... Its been like 5 years since I've done one so my memories might have slipped.
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Old 12-25-2007, 03:00 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curtludwig
I think your buddy is wrong but the more we talk about this the more doubts I have...
I *think* the way I did it was to put some rope down the sparkplug hole and just turn the inner half of the clutch backwards and it unthreaded itself from the crank. This I'm reasonably sure the inner half of the clutch is independantly threaded onto the crank thus no removal tool is needed. You might need a big strap wrench to make the inner half turn. I think I was able to just grab it with both hands and turn it though... Its been like 5 years since I've done one so my memories might have slipped.
Exactly, the old Rotax singles and twins had thread on clutches. Just a standard RH thread. No puller required.
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Old 12-26-2007, 06:43 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Jim Jessup, cutludwig, thanks for the help, guys. I was just going to stuff the cylinder with rags to pull the bolt. Then I'll spin it off like you said. Cheers!
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Old 01-11-2009, 04:56 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by curtludwig View Post
Pulling the clutch is easy, its in 2 pieces, remove the bolt and the outer part comes off, then unscrew the inner part from the crank. The hardest part if you've already pulled the jug will be keeping the crank from turning without damaging it.
Some folks will tell you you can't replace the crank seals without splitting the case. However I've had reasonably good luck heating the seal up and gently slipping it into place with a dull screwdriver. Patience is the key on this one...
1st- Sorry for the late quote;
2nd- You remove the first part of the cluch by removing the bolt, then...if you haven't removed the head & cover do as you said, stuff a rope in the cylinder. If I recall, to remove the clutch you have to turn it clock wise (CW) for it to spin off of the crank. If you have the head and cover off, turn the crank until you see a void in the counter balance weights...stick a large block of wood in there to prevent the crank from turning and again turn your clutch CW to remove it from the crank. And
3rd- since you have your engine apart this far, might as well split the base to remove the seals...much safer than going at it with a screw driver and risk scratching the seal seats. Don't forget, your carb needs vacuum to operate and if you damage the seal seats...screw your vacuum!!!

By the way, I'm rebuilding a 299 also. I rebuilt my 250 3yrs ago and she still starts on a quarter turn today. Have fun.
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Old 01-17-2009, 12:02 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Tripeudélan View Post
1st- Sorry for the late quote;
2nd- You remove the first part of the cluch by removing the bolt, then...if you haven't removed the head & cover do as you said, stuff a rope in the cylinder. If I recall, to remove the clutch you have to turn it clock wise (CW) for it to spin off of the crank. If you have the head and cover off, turn the crank until you see a void in the counter balance weights...stick a large block of wood in there to prevent the crank from turning and again turn your clutch CW to remove it from the crank. And
3rd- since you have your engine apart this far, might as well split the base to remove the seals...much safer than going at it with a screw driver and risk scratching the seal seats. Don't forget, your carb needs vacuum to operate and if you damage the seal seats...screw your vacuum!!!

By the way, I'm rebuilding a 299 also. I rebuilt my 250 3yrs ago and she still starts on a quarter turn today. Have fun.

In order to get the clutch off you need to turn the clutch counter clockwise to remove (looking at the end where the bolt goes)otherwise you will just be trying to tighten it further. If it was clockwise the crankshaft would constantly be trying to unscrew the clutch while driving.
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Old 01-18-2009, 10:52 AM   #11 (permalink)
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CWW vs CW

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Originally Posted by carlsonauto View Post
In order to get the clutch off you need to turn the clutch counter clockwise to remove (looking at the end where the bolt goes)otherwise you will just be trying to tighten it further. If it was clockwise the crankshaft would constantly be trying to unscrew the clutch while driving.
Thanks. As I said, I wasn't quite sure about that part. Good call.
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