NGK br9es to br8es whats the differance? - Snowmobile Forum: Your #1 Snowmobile Forum

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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-30-2007, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
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NGK br9es to br8es whats the differance?

Well, i have br8es plugs in my sled. (stock plug) and i went to the dealer and he gave me br9es....whats the differance between the 2 plugs? Whats better to run? The sled seems to have more zip with the br9es than the br8es? Is that just because the br8es where old? I have heard the br8es run hotter...is that true? What should i use.

Its in a 2000 indy 340.

Does that even make sense? lol...

If someone could clear this up for me that would be great.
Thanks!
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-30-2007, 12:41 PM
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The 8's are one step hotter than the 9's. If it runs better with the 9's, it won't hurt a thing to use 'em. You may foul plugs a bit more, especially when it gets warmer out...

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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-30-2007, 01:06 PM Thread Starter
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Ok thanks, as long as it doesnt hurt anything, i will leave the 09's in until spring.
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-30-2007, 02:43 PM
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As long as you aren't fouling the 9s they should be fine.

If you start fouling them switch back to the 8s. There might be a reason there were 8s in there, though.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-30-2007, 04:23 PM
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Go to Wikipedia below. It explains the numbers and letter.

Spark plug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

or this site

Spark Plug Identification Table | Parts Information | ACDelco
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-08-2015, 11:34 AM
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I did find that in that engine the Champions are even better, lil bit more zip in the 340 fanners, funny how that is from doo to Polaris and different models
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-09-2015, 12:32 AM
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the number is the ability for the plug to dissipate heat. Hotter does not equate to more power.

The manufacturer does testing to figure out the heat range required by the machine. They want the plug to run as hot as possible without creating issues. Issues such as burning out a plug.

Because manufacturers like to have large tolerances as well, running a 8 or 9 when the other is called for will have very little effect on a stock engine.

I've also done quite of bit of testing a different spark plugs in my engines. In one particular machine, my Skidoo Touring 380, I've always had a problem with plugs going bad on it. The NGK plugs would go along just fine and then just quite. Like a fuse, they burn out. Found that Autolites would do okay at first, but would quickly fade away. Bosch acted pretty much the same as the NGK. Champions would oil foul, but could be easily cleaned up and run again. I'm running Champs in it now and they have about 500 miles on it. Typically I have gotten about 100 miles per set of plugs. Yes, it fouls them that much.

I do have a Arctic Cat Jag 340 that the recommended plug is a BR9EYA. EYA is just a BR9EA with a V groove in the anode. The V groove helps prevent fouling. The only plugs in that 340 that have been fouled were the plugs it came with when I got it from a friend.
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-09-2015, 08:53 AM
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What I was trying to say, is that for example the Champion N2s were better in the Polaris then the NGKs, but what we did find here in Ontario, that if you bought NGKs say from Canadian Tire in the bubblewrap plastic containers, (2)that for some reason (I think they hit in shipping) that they did not work a good as same NGK that you get at dealers singly in cardboard
Now with the vintage sleds 60s and 70s, I would assume that the plugs todays are far more advanced then the manufaturers say to use back then, well one would assume that, yet I have some old Boshe plugs that still work great in a 69 Olympic?
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-09-2015, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by poidy View Post
What I was trying to say, is that for example the Champion N2s were better in the Polaris then the NGKs, but what we did find here in Ontario, that if you bought NGKs say from Canadian Tire in the bubblewrap plastic containers, (2)that for some reason (I think they hit in shipping) that they did not work a good as same NGK that you get at dealers singly in cardboard
Now with the vintage sleds 60s and 70s, I would assume that the plugs todays are far more advanced then the manufaturers say to use back then, well one would assume that, yet I have some old Boshe plugs that still work great in a 69 Olympic?
Champion plugs are spec'ed for most of those motors. The horrendous quality control with Champion at one point led dealers and owners to run equivalent NGK plugs because they were more reliable. It lasted for so long that NGK became the "default" plug and no one even bothered to read that their motor was still recommended to use Champion plugs.

Now that Champion has gotten themselves back to producing a reliably good plug, their plug is going to make the motor run the way that it should.

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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 04:00 AM
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okay, I'm trying to reason out how one plug can produce a "better" spark than another, as long as it goes BANG in the end, what does it matter?

Now, I can see where reliability and longevity would come into play, but as long as they are producing a spark, brand shouldn't matter.
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post #11 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 06:41 AM
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There is definitely the possibility of spark quality having some variance, but the main problem was getting the spark at all, at the right time, for the right duration, etc.

I don't remember all of the details, but the story goes something like this: Two brothers owned the company and ran it together. In the 70's and 80's, they were trying to squeeze the company for profits and the quality suffered - badly. In 1989, the company was bought out and the production issues were fixed, resulting in it being a quality plug again. By then, however, the damage was done. Mechanics, professional and hobbyist, wouldn't install the plugs in any of their motors because of all of the issues (misfires, no fires, bad threads, etc.) and simply learned the cross-references by heart.

NGK was well-known at that point for making a reliable and inexpensive plug that worked pretty well in snowmobile motors, so they became what people -believed- were the OEM plug.

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post #12 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-10-2015, 07:37 PM
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It is funny but I can attest to this as well. Any Fuji Polaris engine I have ever had runs best with NGK plugs. Any of the Liberty motors have always run best with a champion. Same heat range, same plugs but it will always make a difference and I have no idea how you explain why...
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post #13 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-11-2015, 07:55 AM
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Good information here. Plugs, while a very simple part of the engine, can generate a lot of discussion.

I take it most of you guys ride with a spare set handy just in case? I always save the old plugs and keep them as spares for riding.

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post #14 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-11-2015, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Skier76 View Post
Good information here. Plugs, while a very simple part of the engine, can generate a lot of discussion.

I take it most of you guys ride with a spare set handy just in case? I always save the old plugs and keep them as spares for riding.
At least one spare set, two if I have a set of new ones AND a set that were swapped out but known to still be good. I ran Iridiums in the Pro-R for the last two seasons and they still look like new.

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post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-14-2015, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by TheBearAk View Post
The manufacturer does testing to figure out the heat range required by the machine. They want the plug to run as hot as possible without creating issues. Issues such as burning out a plug.
The same could be said the other way... You want the plug to be as cold as possible without fouling it. A colder plug will generally make more power, or at least let the engine potentially make more power. Also, there is nothing to risk by being too cold, other than replacing plugs more often. On the other hand, running too hot can cost an engine. (pre-ignition)

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post #16 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-14-2015, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by smokingcrater View Post
The same could be said the other way... You want the plug to be as cold as possible without fouling it. A colder plug will generally make more power, or at least let the engine potentially make more power. Also, there is nothing to risk by being too cold, other than replacing plugs more often. On the other hand, running too hot can cost an engine. (pre-ignition)
Premature detonation (pre-ignition) is caused by octane levels being too low for the setup of the motor. If the manufacturer wants to run "the hottest plug", and temperature becomes a factor for pre-ignition, the octane level requirements for the motor will be raised.

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post #17 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-14-2015, 02:52 PM
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Running to hot of a plug, you'll almost always melt the center and/or ground electrode on the plug when running to hot. It will also pit and weaken the ceramic. That will all happen well before pre-ignition happens.

Good article on plugs:

NGK Spark Plugs USA
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